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how should I frame my study in concern of programming  RSS feed

 
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Can some one please suggest me how should i organize my study in concern of the programming things like data structures,programming language,algorithms,database related languages,things like jsp,servlet,spring..etc

Help will be appreciated.

Kind regards,
Praveen.
 
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Just a suggestion. You will have to decide for yourself what you are going to do.
Are you doing a course? If so, organise your learning to match the course.
If not, start by considering what you don't know. If you are going to do any programming at all, you would absolutely need to know both the theory and the practice of data structures and algorithms. The theory of programming and program semantics would be useful. While you learn the theory, also learn their practical application, so along with learning data structures find out about the Java® Collections Framework which implements many of those data structures. Consider writing some simple examples, e.g. your own Stack interface and implementations (ArrayStack and LinkedStack, maybe).
 
praveen kumaar
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Yes i am doing a course,it is *Bachelor in Computer Application*.But i am doing it through a distance learning so i have plenty of free time to learn things along with learning my course.currently i am learning core java.i am practicing it for about 5 months but their are plenty of things in it.so i get confused several time which one to pick.currently i am trying to strengthen the basics first and for the same reason i have not touch its gui part yet.can i study about data structures and algorithms after learning gui or prior to it.i am also thinking to read the book "clean code" and "think like a programmer" before heading towards any other thing as i have noticed in this forum,*junilu* always suggest to read these books at the very start.he mentioned that the concepts are very helpful in any programming language.
so what now?

Praveen.
 
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Practice, practice, practice. Be critical of your code. Always try to find things that can be improved and then try to make it better. Try different approaches to the same problem and see which approaches produce code that's clearer and better. Read code written by other people. Pay special attention to code written by experienced people and try to understand the thought processes that resulted in that kind of code. Then try to go through the same process yourself.

A couple of keys to the above: Learn how to refactor and do it often. Learn how to write good unit tests.

Good luck.
 
Junilu Lacar
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praveen kumaar wrote:i am also thinking to read the book "clean code" and "think like a programmer" ... as i have noticed ... always suggest to read these books at the very start.

I'm glad you noticed that. 

They are very good books and if you read them thoroughly and try to follow the advice you get from them, you'll be equipped with many useful tools that will help you learn faster and better.  Another book I recommend is Corey Haines' Understanding the Four Rules of Simple Design - a very short book (70+ pages) with lots of excellent insights about design, testing, and refactoring.
 
praveen kumaar
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Junilu wrote: ...Another book I recommend is Corey Haines' Understanding the Four Rules of Simple Design - a very short book (70+ pages) with lots of excellent insights about design, testing, and refactoring.
Thanks for the suggestion,i have just put this book in my archive.i am very fond of learning and discovering new things so pages really doesn't matter for me.i will read it even it has 1000 pages,i believe in the hard work and the practice and my interest.and what i am doing is with interest.
junilu,if you don't mind can you please provide a structural or an organised way to read these books(please include data structure and algorithms in it) so that i can plan the order of reading those books.please suggest the book for the data structure and algorithms also,if possible.
and my apologies if it is irking you.

Kind Regards,
Praveen.
 
Junilu Lacar
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praveen kumaar wrote:junilu,if you don't mind can you please provide a structural or an organised way to read these books(please include data structure and algorithms in it) so that i can plan the order of reading those books.

Please keep in mind that each person has a different learning style so what works for me may not be the best thing for you. I seldom read books from front to back. I'll just skim through them at first, getting a general feel for the material, then come back to a specific section when I encounter something in my work or practice that I think relates to it.

Having said that, I find that what works for me in general follows Shu Ha Ri. Andy Hunt also writes about similar things like the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition in his book Pragmatic Thinking & Learning: Refactor Your Wetware. These are about mindsets and self-awareness. That may seem very abstract and non-technical but I find that focusing solely on the material you're learning without paying attention to the learner is like trying to understand Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland while you're stuck at a fourth grade reading level. I don't know if that makes a lot of sense. I tried to explain it but it got pretty long and rambling so for now, just refer to what I wrote in this thread: https://coderanch.com/t/674510/java/Opinion-Java-Experts#3158038

 
praveen kumaar
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Junilu wrote:..Learn how to write good unit tests.
What is exactly the unit test.
 
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Unit testing is when you test a small chunk (unit) of your program, usually a method in Java.  There can be several tests per method.  All the unit test for one program often go into another program called <ClassName>Test.

JUnit is a very common testing framework for Java.  I would Google junit tutorial and pick one or more of them.  JUnit at its simplest provides a way to run your tests and a bunch or assertions that you can make on the behavior or output of your methods.

The science/art of testing can get pretty complex, but basic testing is easy enough.  You will find yourself writing better methods when you keep unit testing in mind.  In fact, one type of development technique is to write the tests first and then the actual method.
 
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