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When do you get good at this?  RSS feed

 
Sean Marquis
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I decided to make a new thread; it's not a programming one more like a general question.

How long did it take for everyone to get good at this? I appreciate the help I receive greatly but often I end up being even more confused especially in person with a tutor, it just kind of goes over my head.

I asked my instructor and though he said it varies from person to person he didn't give me a concrete answer as to how much I should be studying/practicing a day. Any suggestions for a frustrated newbie? I'm learning through a college course, not self-taught so I'm kind of in a time span too as far as understanding the material and assignments.
 
Junilu Lacar
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Well, it really does vary from person to person. It's like learning anything: there's an element of effort you put into it and also an element of aptitude and talent. You can learn enough of another language like French or Japanese to have a modest-sized vocabulary in maybe a few months or so. To really be fluent would take longer. To be able to write for a living, that would take even more mastery of the language and some talent. Some people can get to that level of expertise in as little as a year. Some may take longer. Some may never get there at all. It also depends on what your definition of "good" is.

Additionally, when it comes to programming, it helps if you like solving puzzles because programming involves the same kind of thinking you use when solving puzzles like Sudoku and "Who Owns the Zebra?." There's a lot of logic and reasoning involved in programming. You also need to learn how to attack problems systematically and be able to visualize solutions and recognize loopholes. There's a lot of abstract thinking involved. They say people who are good at solving word problems, math problems, play music, and are artistic or otherwise pursue other kinds of creative endeavors like poetry use the same areas of the brain that you use when you develop software. My experience with other developers seems to align with that, too.
 
Paul Clapham
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I was good at it right away. I'm one of those people who Junilu just described. However if you sent me off to learn dancing instead of programming, I wouldn't be good at it right away, and I'd probably be permanently in the pit of incomprehension.
 
Dave Tolls
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Paul Clapham wrote:I was good at it right away. I'm one of those people who Junilu just described. However if you sent me off to learn dancing instead of programming, I wouldn't be good at it right away, and I'd probably be permanently in the pit of incomprehension.


My brain comprehends dancing...it's the rest of me that has a tendency to fail spectactularly!
:)
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Please also see this thread.
There is nothing wrong with a time limit. There is a limited time for you to learn and in that time you will learn the basics. You need to know that you are only scratching the surface in a BSc course. But you have a deadline. Although the deadline can be changed if, for example, you fall ill one week before it, meeting deadlines is one of the skills you have to learn.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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