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Getting Experience for a Job

 
Greenhorn
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Hi Folks,

I got a cs degree back in 2010. I worked jobs that werent related to IT field at all (I dont have any professional programming experience). Because i was away from coding for so long. I bought a couple of Java related courses on Udemy.

I started one with below:
https://www.udemy.com/java-the-complete-java-developer-course/

After i finish this, i will be going through the stuff below:


https://www.udemy.com/javaspring
https://www.udemy.com/building-an-e-commerce-store-using-java-spring-framework/
https://www.udemy.com/complete-e-commerce-course-javaspringhibernate-and-mysql/
https://www.udemy.com/spring-hibernate-tutorial/


At the point i have no idea what kind of project i can do to set myself apart from the usual candidate. I am wondering if anybody has suggestions, Can Android projects be enough too ? I have some stuff for that too.
I am planning to make a github account and a web page to display the project i will make and use things like project euler and other type of exercise sites to study for interviews hoping those exercises will be enough.

 
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If you don't mind me asking, why didn't you get a programming job after you graduated? After being idle for so, it will definitely not be easy. The tech industry is very fast paced six years is twice as long as in most fields. With your degree though, it will definitely aid you in getting back into the filed since you at least have the fundamentals down.  

A major connundrum of our education system is that it stuffs us with a bunch of theory. In school, we are taught things like the details of how computers work, algorithms, abstract data types, programming languages, operating systems, proofs, grammers to name a few. This is fine if you want to come out and start building your own compiler, or be able to figure out optimal solutions to programming puzzles, but in the real world that counts on make full fledged programs that help business, or otherwise, the practical stuff, it is nearly completely useless. Very few of us will ever need to write a compile or create a new programming language. This stuff is reserved for actual computer scientist. not for the rest of us working in the real world.

However, one silver lining to this is that it does teach you the fundamentals, so you can still understand new technology as it comes out, and as fades fade away. New technology, no matter how seemingly revolutionary or amazing, we still at its core, rely on the theory.

With that, I say go forth and conquer. Don't let your cs degree go to waste.
 
John Doherty
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William Ng wrote:If you don't mind me asking, why didn't you get a programming job after you graduated? After being idle for so, it will definitely not be easy. The tech industry is very fast paced six years is twice as long as in most fields. With your degree though, it will definitely aid you in getting back into the filed since you at least have the fundamentals down.  

A major connundrum of our education system is that it stuffs us with a bunch of theory. In school, we are taught things like the details of how computers work, algorithms, abstract data types, programming languages, operating systems, proofs, grammers to name a few. This is fine if you want to come out and start building your own compiler, or be able to figure out optimal solutions to programming puzzles, but in the real world that counts on make full fledged programs that help business, or otherwise, the practical stuff, it is nearly completely useless. Very few of us will ever need to write a compile or create a new programming language. This stuff is reserved for actual computer scientist. not for the rest of us working in the real world.

However, one silver lining to this is that it does teach you the fundamentals, so you can still understand new technology as it comes out, and as fades fade away. New technology, no matter how seemingly revolutionary or amazing, we still at its core, rely on the theory.

With that, I say go forth and conquer. Don't let your cs degree go to waste.



Lots of reasons but to boil it down. I wasn't ready for a coding job and the dedication it requires to be a good,competent coder. Now i feel that i am there (Maybe not but for me it feels like it).
 
William Ng
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So you are one of the examples as I mentioned of the kind of graduates are educational system produces, the ones who are theory knowledgeable, but not real world knowledgeable. The least you should have done was to at least keep your skill sharp and up to date. That is probably one of the best ways besides getting an entry position somewhere, which seems to be a rarity these days with business requiring large skill sets even for these 'entry' positions.  
 
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