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How do I read programming books efficiently and fast?  RSS feed

 
basith ali kamil
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there are so many programming books with tons of pages and coding example when I reading a programming book should I have to read that book first and do the codings second or have to code while reading. if I code while reading it takes more time so what is the better way to gain efficiency?

 
Junilu Lacar
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You say that as if you think learning is like running a marathon. It's not.

It's like eating. You can only go as fast as your body can handle it. In the case of eating, your stomach and how much it can digest and your body and how fast it can metabolize your food are the limiting factors. In the case of learning, it's your brain that is the limiting factor. How fast can you understand a concept after you read it? How quickly can you process what you read and turn it into learning and skill? Well, that all depends on how much you practice. Did Arnold Schwarzenegger become a Mr. Universe the second day after he started lifting weights? No. Did Michael Jordan become the greatest basketball player that ever lived after shooting a few three-point shots in the playground?

And coming back to my first analogy, do you think any of the winners of the Boston Marathon or any marathon became the runners they are/were after running around for a few miles to warm up?

What makes you think you can just rush through some books and become a programmer then?

If you want to learn how to learn efficiently and effectively, then just look at my signature below.

 
John Joe
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Code while reading. You will get better understanding on that, at least for me
 
Jesper de Jong
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I agree with John Joe, trying things out for yourself is in my opinion essential for learning. You can't learn programming by just reading lots of books - like you can't learn how to ride a bicycle or how to swim from reading books.
 
Paul Clapham
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Jesper de Jong wrote:I agree with John Joe, trying things out for yourself is in my opinion essential for learning.


Absolutely. Here's what I have always done: suppose I want to learn how to use ventricles* in my code. So I find the Oracle tutorial about how to write ventricles in Java and start going through it. After a while I download the sample code and start messing around with it, while going through the tutorial so I can try out what I think it's talking about. After enough messing around, I end up with something I can put into my code to get the ventricles working. And as a side effect I can put ventricles into a different application at a later date.

* Not a real Java thing, just a place-holder for some arbitrary feature.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Basith,
It depends on what your goal is. If you want to get an overview, reading is fine> If you want to be able to program with the feature/understand it well, you definitely have to write code.

It's not faster to read and then code though. It just means you can read more pages in a row. I do read first because I read on the train and code at home. This means I'm reading multiple times. Not faster!
 
basith ali kamil
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Basith,
It depends on what your goal is. If you want to get an overview, reading is fine> If you want to be able to program with the feature/understand it well, you definitely have to write code.

It's not faster to read and then code though. It just means you can read more pages in a row. I do read first because I read on the train and code at home. This means I'm reading multiple times. Not faster!


yeah, an exact answer I'm looking for. very well explained I'm not reading fast but I travel a lot so i won't get time to code while reading. that's y I confused now onward have to concentrate on reading first next coding i think if I do both on time it take more time to go through many books. i have to read many books and understand things thanks mate
 
Junilu Lacar
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Well, there's reading, and then there's comprehension. How much of what you read do you really understand? I'm always amazed at how those competitive eaters you see on TV (the record is currently held by Joey Chestnut at 73 hotdogs in 10 minutes—that's just a little over 8 seconds per hotdog!) can down so much food so fast.

By the same token, if you're as voracious a reader as Joey Chestnut is a hotdog-eater, there's still only so much your brain can take before you need to stop and let it digest some of the things you have consumed. Like if you read everything about Java from basic flow control statements right through to lambda expressions and streams, how much of that material can you really comprehend and retain without the reinforcement that practice gives you? Practice is how you absorb what you have consumed. It's how you metabolize ideas and turn them into lean, mean, programming muscle. Without practice, anything you read will likely just become either a lot of disjoint information floating around in your head (if you remember everything) or stuff you'll have to go back and read again anyway. Or, as is the case with eating more hotdogs than your stomach can handle, it's something that your body will simply dispose of, one way or another.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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basith ali kamil wrote:yeah, an exact answer I'm looking for. very well explained I'm not reading fast but I travel a lot so i won't get time to code while reading.

There's types of reading that are good for planes/travel/where you didn't have a computer available. For example:
  • process - ex: agile
  • patterns
  • architecture
  • a language or library you want tto get an overview of

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    basith ali kamil
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    Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:
    basith ali kamil wrote:yeah, an exact answer I'm looking for. very well explained I'm not reading fast but I travel a lot so i won't get time to code while reading.

    There's types of reading that are good for planes/travel/where you didn't have a computer available. For example:
  • process - ex: agile
  • patterns
  • architecture
  • a language or library you want tto get an overview of



  • thanks my bro. we waste lots of time while traveling if we travel on a better schedule. we can make our time usable in a proper way. thanks again I will look forward. if you have time give me some motivation and advice to learn java in the proper way quickly and perfectly
     
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