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How long would it take to learn Java if i spend full time everyday ?  RSS feed

 
basith ali kamil
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I'm new to java. but I have learned to code for three years but didn't code continuously. and also done with my software engineering degree but not much experience in coding I need to be a java developer have to get a job sooner as java Developer. how long will it take if I give full effort on learning java daily? need to be professional java developer give me some advice and ways to learn etc.
thank you
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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It varies by person; this isn't something I can answer. It depends on your background, learning speed and target.

The first step is to pick a book. Make sure you write lots of code. Try all the examples and make your own.

Also, think about the question of why should an employer hire you without experience. People typically use pet projects/volunteer projects/sharing code on github/certifications to get around this.
 
Junilu Lacar
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I got my first job as a Java programmer having zero experience in Java but a fresh SCJ2P feather on my hat. This was way back in 2000, before I even signed up on JavaRanch, as this place was known back then. I did have a little over ten years of programming experience in other languages by that time so that was probably a big factor in getting me in the door as well. I can't say your chances are good if you don't have any programming experience at all, unless you're willing to take an entry-level position. Even with an entry-level position, you're still going to need to demonstrate a good grasp of programming and Java concepts when you go for the interview and I really don't think you can do that without some intensive practice.
 
John Joe
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Well, it depends how much "input" you can receive and how much "output" you can apply...
 
basith ali kamil
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:It varies by person; this isn't something I can answer. It depends on your background, learning speed and target.

The first step is to pick a book. Make sure you write lots of code. Try all the examples and make your own.

Also, think about the question of why should an employer hire you without experience. People typically use pet projects/volunteer projects/sharing code on github/certifications to get around this.


yeah as you said  I'm learning the book called "HeadFirst Java" by now I have read 100 pages but it took me around 3 days. I feel good after going through every exercise but I think it will take time to finish this book 😉. thanks a lot for guiding me again. I'm new to  "JavaRanch" just 5 days still it's SO satisfying.
 
basith ali kamil
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Junilu Lacar wrote:I got my first job as a Java programmer having zero experience in Java but a fresh SCJ2P feather on my hat. This was way back in 2000, before I even signed up on JavaRanch, as this place was known back then. I did have a little over ten years of programming experience in other languages by that time so that was probably a big factor in getting me in the door as well. I can't say your chances are good if you don't have any programming experience at all, unless you're willing to take an entry-level position. Even with an entry-level position, you're still going to need to demonstrate a good grasp of programming and Java concepts when you go for the interview and I really don't think you can do that without some intensive practice.


yeah, brother even for entry level job I have to be some my own experience. thanks, these thinks motivates me to go forward I will complete some books ASAP then will look for a job
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Remember that the Head First Java book uses an old version of Java. It's still a great first book, but make sure you supplement it with another to learn the newer syntax features.
 
Barry Burd
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:It varies by person; this isn't something I can answer. It depends on your background, learning speed and target.

The first step is to pick a book. Make sure you write lots of code. Try all the examples and make your own.

Also, think about the question of why should an employer hire you without experience. People typically use pet projects/volunteer projects/sharing code on github/certifications to get around this.


I agree with Jeanne. The advice that I always give is (1) Do as much coding as you can, and (2) Attend meetings of Java developers near where you live.
The idea here is that practicing coding is the best way (maybe the only way) to learn coding. Also, attending meetings makes you aware of the issues that developers face. You may not understand what the developers are talking about, but you always learn something. Sometimes, you learn what you should know but don't know, and that's a good thing.
 
basith ali kamil
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Remember that the Head First Java book uses an old version of Java. It's still a great first book, but make sure you supplement it with another to learn the newer syntax features.


oh, what book will you suggest me to read?
 
Matthean Brown
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basith ali kamil wrote:
Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Remember that the Head First Java book uses an old version of Java. It's still a great first book, but make sure you supplement it with another to learn the newer syntax features.


oh, what book will you suggest me to read?


I would start aiming for books that cover at least Java 8 since 9 is just about to come out. If the Head Start book is the 2nd edition one from 2005, then yeah, that looks to be Java 5. I have a soft spot for books by Murach since they tend to take a rather application driven approach to things so you start small and then add on as you go and end up with an app at the end. One thing to consider, Java does a lot of things so you'll want to figure out what you want to focus on(web, mobile, etc), and then go from there. Go through something like Murach's Beginning Java with Eclipse as Eclipse is a rather well known IDE that I use to code Java with at work. I've used different flavors of it for a number of languages, but bygones. You might want to look into learning Java Spring after that. Again, it is vastly up to you based on what direction you pick.
 
Knute Snortum
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Java in a Nutshell (http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920030775.do) is a good, scholarly look at the language.  It includes Java 8.
 
Matt Moran
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If you start now, and you spend all day every day on it, you will never be done learning Java.
You'll get good at it of course, and some areas you'll master, but it is a vast, vast subject with more & more APIs appearing daily. You will have embarked upon an adventure that will never end, as long as you do not give up. It's kinda like if you'd asked "If I spend all day every day learning Physics, how long will it take to learn everything?" - the boundary shifts as you approach it, and if you're very good, you get to expand the boundary yourself.
 
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