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Recipe of the Week: Bear's "Pantry Raid" 3-Bean Chili

 
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Bear's "Pantry Raid" 3-Bean Chili

So named because it uses primarily canned products from the pantry.





1 large onion, diced
1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes
1 28 oz can diced tomatoes
1 16 oz jar salsa (choose heat level to your tastes)
1 lb beef, coarsely ground (home-ground has better texture)
1 lb pork, coarsely ground
2 8 oz cans whole green chiles, diced (or use fresh)
3 15 oz cans beans, various types (or 1 lb cooked dried beans)
1 8 oz can tomato sauce
1 1/2 t garlic powder
1 1/2 t kosher salt
2 t black pepper
1 1/2 t chili power
1 t cumin
1 t Cavendar's Greek Seasoning
1 1/2 c beef stock

1. Preheat oven to 300ºF.

2. Drain and rinse beans, chop chiles into bite-sized pieces.

3. In a Dutch oven¹, sauté onion in oil until evenly browned.

4. Add crushed tomatoes and sauté until reduced to a paste and just beginning to brown on the bottom. Do not skimp on this step; a great deal of flavor is developed by this process.

5. Add all remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly. Bring to a slow boil.

6. Put into oven for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Serve topped with shredded cheddar, Jalapeños  and saltines. Add a dollop of sour cream if desired.


¹ Le Cruset (pictured) calls their Dutch oven pan a "French oven". Go figure.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Note: using low-sodium or "no salt added" canned products greatly reduces the amount of sodium in the dish for those needing a lower-sodium diet.
 
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I see you're a Penzey's fan. They have a store near where my wife works.

I've seen the Greek seasoning in the supermarket, but I've never tried it. For the most part I mix up my own, using stuff from the herb garden where possible. I love the look on people's faces when I go out in the yard and start hacking up shrubbery for dinner.  

The local soil (such as it is) tends to make peppers hot and sweet things sweet. They grow "Vidalia" onions around here, but since Vidalia is actually in Georgia, they're not allowed to call them that. St Augustine is famous for its datil peppers. Not quite up to ghost pepper strength, but a solid 100,000+ scoville units means you'll feel it. I don't do well on my vegetable gardening, but I make up for it in different types of hot peppers. In addition to datils, I do well with habaneros, serranos and de Arboles. In fact, I need to go out and see what needs picking right now.

There are those who insist that "real" chili doesn't have beans, but unless it's going on hot dogs or Cincinnati spaghetti, I like my chili with beans.




 
Bear Bibeault
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Tim Holloway wrote:I see you're a Penzey's fan. They have a store near where my wife works.


Yes, I get the majority of my spices from Penzeys. I like them a lot.

I love the look on people's faces when I go out in the yard and start hacking up shrubbery for dinner.  


Same here. I grow a number of types of basil, rosemary, thyme and sometimes oregano. I also have loquat trees the I harvest for their fruit.

Many years (though not this year) I'll grow chiles of various types. But I already have bags and bags of them in the freezer so I skipped this year.

I wish I had the soil to grow citrus.

There are those who insist that "real" chili doesn't have beans, but unless it's going on hot dogs or Cincinnati spaghetti, I like my chili with beans.



Yeah, I'm in Texas so "chili" means meat and a sauce made with chile peppers. No beans, no tomato.

Maybe I should name the dish Bear's "Pantry Raid" 3-Bean Yankee Chili

I like the Texas-style chili too, but this recipe most represents our taste in chili.
 
Tim Holloway
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Citrus grows in sand, but much of Texas gets too cold for oranges lemons and limes. Then again, I have a Key Lime and by rights, those things aren't supposed to be able to live north of Cape Canaveral. Blame Global Warming. It's also why I can now grow pineapples and maybe even get some bananas this year.

The local citrus nursery has been pushing limequats. They're kumquats, so they're cold-hardy, but the fruit is lime-like. I was tempted, but I have an enormous old Persian Lime tree and I harvest baseball-sized limes by the bucket for much of the year.
 
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Tim Holloway wrote:I have an enormous old Persian Lime tree and I harvest baseball-sized limes by the bucket for much of the year.


Jealous!
 
Tim Holloway
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At the grocery store, limes often run 2 for $3 and they're nasty little runty things. I laugh every time I go by. The key limes (which come from Mexico) are even worse - practically marbles. My Key Lime tree isn't very productive, but at least the limes it has are respectable.

This year I'm expecting some Meyer Lemons, too. They grow well around here.
 
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