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Cricket question

 
Sheriff
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This question came up in internal discussions among colleagues of mine. Now, I copy/paste question exactly as it appeared there.
I'll tell later answer I submitted and the actual answer by the person who constructed this question.

I want to see what are answers of yours. So, what is your answer and reasoning?

A question for all cricket lovers, maths genious, teachers and friends. .!!
How many maximum runs a single player can score in One day match (50 overs/ 300 balls)
No 'no balls', no wides, no extras, no over throws...So how much runs he can score max???
this quetion came in CSAT and 99% people answered it wrong..
Choices :
A) 1800.
B) 1650.
C) 1653.
D) 1550.
E) 1555
F) 1506
G) 0900

 
Marshal
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The theoretical maximum is a six off each ball; but the other batsman would have to score a single off the first ball in every over but the first so the player will be facing the bowling; that makes 1800 − 6 × 49 = 8793465934796.
No‑balls don't count; they count towards the score for the team, not for an individual player. Nor even an individual gentleman.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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A few minutes ago, I wrote:. . . the other batsman would have to score a single off the first ball in every over . . .

. . . or any other odd numbered score.
 
Marshal
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So, it looks like your answer would be 1506 then.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Either that or 8793465934796
 
Liutauras Vilda
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Cards face up.

Since I know nothing about the cricket, my answer and the reasoning was:

1. Options A, B, C, D are illegal answers as each of them ending with period. So they are invalid mathematical numbers, hence can't represent score.
2. Option G isn't a valid number too. At best it is a valid phone number code, which is paid, I'm afraid.
3. So, we are left with options E and F. From the probability theory point of view, since most of the answers (if they were legal) are multiples of 5's in order to confuse reader, my best guess would be option E.



And the "correct" answer from the question's author was:

A single batsman can score (33*49)+36 = 1653 runs in an innings without any kind of extras.

33 runs cause five sixes and last ball three to retain strike. In 50th over it will 36 as he need not keep strike any more.



So basically I was wrong I think author of the question was wrong too, purely because of poorly constructed question.

Campbell, turns out you were wrong too. But since I don't know cricket I can't verify that for sure.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Depends whether you can score a 5 and keep facing; in which case he could score 35 × 49 + 36 = 1751; if you can only score 3 without a boundary 1653 would be correct.
 
Rancher
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Wow, that's confusing! Excellent topic, but with all due respect to all cricket lovers, I think I will stick to hockey...scoring rules much much simpler.  
 
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Same here, I will stick with football
 
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