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Pete Letkeman
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I have found that sometimes I would like to question the guest Author of the week about some thing somewhat related to their book and/or knowledge base.
At the same time I would not like that post to be considered for the promotional draw.
This is due to the fact that I'm just scratching the surface in that area and I know that others would make much better use of the book, them then me if I do win.

So how can I ask a question or where should I post the question, which is somewhat related to the Author of the week and/or their knowledge base without having my post be considered for the random draw?


Edit: Typo Fixed
 
Tim Cooke
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The best thing to do would be to drop a PM to the person running the promotion and let them know that you don't want to be picked as a winner. That'll leave you free to question the author to your hearts content without worry.
 
Pete Letkeman
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Great, thanks Tim.

And to verify, generally speaking the person who if handling the promotion is the person who starts the first thread welcome the author, correct?
For instance, this week you are handling the promotion and we know this because you started this thread
https://coderanch.com/t/684254/framework/John-Carnell
Or is there some other way to tell?
 
Tim Cooke
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Correct.
 
Pete Letkeman
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Thank you very much sir.

I did have a question for John Carnell and his Spring book, but after reading the sample pages on Amazon my question is has been answered.
However I'll keep this approach in mind for the next time something like this comes up.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Pete,
Also keep in mind the answers/discussion posts are entered in the drawing. So you could still win by helping someone else.

I agree with Tim that the best way is to send a PM to the person running the promo before winners are drawn. The second best way is to post a reply in the winner announcement thread saying you already have the book/you prefer it go to someone who needs it before/whatever. (the reason that approach is second best is that it results in re-work for the person drawing the winners.)
 
Pete Letkeman
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Also keep in mind the answers/discussion posts are entered in the drawing. So you could still win by helping someone else.

This is great to know, thanks Jeanne.

This is great for someone like me who knows that they will not take full or any advantage of a free book because they still have many things to learn about the subject matter covered in the book.
For instance, I have not created or done anything with Spring yet.
However I know it's a powerful/vast framework with a lot of uses and there are plenty free of 'How to start' resources which one should probably at least read, if not try, before deciding if a book would help.
 
German Gonzalez-Morris
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Pete Letkeman wrote:Thank you very much sir.

I did have a question for John Carnell and his Spring book, but after reading the sample pages on Amazon my question is has been answered.
However I'll keep this approach in mind for the next time something like this comes up.


It's true you may find the answer by reading sample pages, however, asking the question open to author you may get different answer or even kind of spin-off.
for instance: https://coderanch.com/t/683459/java/Murach-Java-Programming-Certification-Java
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Also, doesn't underestimate the value of a free book. Giving to a teammate or someone you know builds great good will!
 
Pete Letkeman
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Both what Jeanne and German said previously is true.
However it is also sometimes useful to RTM (Read The Manual) before asking a question, and that was the case in this instance.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Pete Letkeman wrote:However it is also sometimes useful to RTM (Read The Manual) before asking a question, and that was the case in this instance.

Agreed. Sometimes trying to post helps. I can't tell you how many times I've started writing a post and figured out the answer.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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That sounds like a kind of rubber duck programming.
 
Pete Letkeman
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:That sounds like a kind of rubber duck programming.

I had not head of that phrase before this posting however I do agree.
Here is the Wikipedia definition:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber_duck_debugging wrote:The name is a reference to a story in the book The Pragmatic Programmer in which a programmer would carry around a rubber duck and debug their code by forcing themselves to explain it, line-by-line, to the duck. Many other terms exist for this technique, often involving different inanimate objects.

Many programmers have had the experience of explaining a programming problem to someone else, possibly even to someone who knows nothing about programming, and then hitting upon the solution in the process of explaining the problem. In describing what the code is supposed to do and observing what it actually does, any incongruity between these two becomes apparent. More generally, teaching a subject forces its evaluation from different perspectives and can provide a deeper understanding. By using an inanimate object, the programmer can try to accomplish this without having to interrupt anyone else.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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I use a stuffed animal rather than a rubber duck. Still works .
 
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