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Randall Twede
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A week and a half ago gas was $2.05/gallon. Now it is $2.59. I guess it is because of the hurricane. How about where you live? Has the price increased like that?
 
Tim Cooke
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I haven't noticed a marked increase in price but gas the UK is generally more expensive than in the US. For example my local garage is priced around £1.20 / litre ($1.56) which is equivalent to $5.93/gallon. Expensive right?
 
Bear Bibeault
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Some idiot started a rumor that gas was in short supply because of the hurricane (it wasn't -- there are plenty of gas reserves). People believed it and everyone ran to the gas station to top off their tanks. Then they topped off topping off their tanks whenever the needle started to move.

Result: gas was in short supply at the pumps because it was getting bought faster than it could be replaced.

In other words: a gasoline bank run.

Result: higher prices. Which, of course, lower back to equilibrium much slower than they raise.
 
Pete Letkeman
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Well Tim, it's not as high for me in Ontario, Canada at $1.23 CAD / litre which is about $4.55 (CAD)/gallon.

This is one thing that I don't understand about Canadian energy and gas.
The Canadian product sells at a lower price point to the US consumers then to Canadian consumers.
This has been the case for years, at least for gas.

However I can drive 20 minutes, give or take a few minutes to allow for crossing the Canada/US boarder, and get gas from a US gas station.
That said, it does cost money to cross the boarder, the bridge fee is what it is are called.
 
Tim Cooke
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A lot of people in Northern Ireland who live near the border will drive over to the Republic to get their gas. It's even better if the Euro is weak.
 
Ron McLeod
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Randall Twede wrote:A week and a half ago gas was $2.05/gallon. Now it is $2.59. I guess it is because of the hurricane. How about where you live? Has the price increased like that?

Even with the recent jump in prices in Texas, we (in Vancouver) are still paying more than double that you all are paying. 


From www.vancouvergasprices.com
 
Devaka Cooray
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About $3.17/gallon here in Sri Lanka
 
Paul Clapham
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Pete Letkeman wrote:However I can drive 20 minutes, give or take a few minutes to allow for crossing the Canada/US boarder, and get gas from a US gas station.
That said, it does cost money to cross the boarder, the bridge fee is what it is are called.


It's nearly an hour for me to go to the US, and even though it doesn't take me long to cross the border (I have a Nexus card) it isn't worth it (for me) just to get cheaper gas. However at least the gas stations near the border accept Canadian credit cards and don't do that BS thing where you have to type in your zip code for "security" reasons.
 
Pete Letkeman
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Paul Clapham wrote:It's nearly an hour for me to go to the US, and even though it doesn't take me long to cross the border (I have a Nexus card) it isn't worth it (for me) just to get cheaper gas.

So, sometimes I can get over to the US in about 20 minutes, but not every time. It all depends on traffic and sometimes it can take an hour or more, Nexus or not. This is what's said about my where I cross according to Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Water_Bridge wrote:Together, the two bridges are the second-busiest commercial crossing between the United States and Canada, after the Ambassador Bridge at Detroit-Windsor. They are the fourth-busiest overall international crossing in Ontario in terms of total number of vehicles.

Not only that but it cost $4 CAD to cross the bridge, so $8 for a round trip.
Spending $8 to get a better price on gas does not seem like a good deal to me, especially since I drive a Smart car (https://www.smart.com/en/en/index/smart-fortwo-453.html) and on average only use one tank a month for  ~500-600 KM
Paul Clapham wrote:gas stations near the border accept Canadian credit cards

Near me as well. I suspect that they would, wouldn't they? We all know that companies like MasterCard and Visa want your money and they are world wide right?
Now, debit cards could be a different story. I don't know I haven't tried.
 
Ron McLeod
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Paul Clapham wrote:However at least the gas stations near the border accept Canadian credit cards and don't do that BS thing where you have to type in your zip code for "security" reasons.

Not sure if your already know this .. when prompted for a 5-digit zip code at a US gas station or store, enter the 3 digits of your postal code (in sequence) followed by 00.  For example, if your postal code is V1Z 2C4, then your verification zip code would be 12400.
 
Randall Twede
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Ron, you assume I actually buy gas, I don't, so I don't pay less than you. but I do notice when it increases dramatically.
 
Randall Twede
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Paying for the bridge really sucks. I went all the way around lake Ontario in 1980 and it was free then.😯
 
Paul Clapham
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Ron McLeod wrote:Not sure if your already know this .. when prompted for a 5-digit zip code at a US gas station or store, enter the 3 digits of your postal code (in sequence) followed by 00.  For example, if your postal code is V1Z 2C4, then your verification zip code would be 12400.


Yeah, I've heard that before and I've tried numerous variations on that theme, and none of them have ever worked for me.
 
Tim Moores
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Pete Letkeman wrote:Spending $8 to get a better price on gas does not seem like a good deal to me

Especially if it takes additional time to get there. Given what someone working in the tech sector makes in an hour, spending an extra half hour for this trip would likely make it uneconomical.
 
Jesper de Jong
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Here in the Netherlands regular gas for cars costs about € 1.65 per liter at the moment = € 6.25 per gallon = US$ 7.45 per gallon.

So, $ 2.05 or $ 2.59 is super cheap!
 
Liutauras Vilda
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Need to save planet. What I notice more often, that every (almost to be honest) Uber driver uses hybrid. Meaning, petrol is just for an engine start, the rest is electricity. It regenerates itself when you drive, so you don't need to go to electricity station to charge your batteries.

Seeing more and more such cars for regular family use. You don't pay congestion charge going to city, while others pay 8 GBP per day to go to city zone 1.

I hope one day we won't breath fresh emitted gas during a walk.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Liutauras Vilda wrote:Need to save planet. . . .
Have never tried an electric car, but I did once read that a hybrid's miles per gallon is hardly better than pure petrol.
I hope one day we won't breath fresh emitted gas during a walk.
If you had tried that in 1975, it would have been much much worse. I remember it well.
 
Jesper de Jong
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Liutauras Vilda wrote:It regenerates itself when you drive, so you don't need to go to electricity station to charge your batteries.

The energy stored in the battery has to come from some external source, it doesn't regenerate itself out of nowhere. A hybrid or electric car is (unfortunately) not a perpetuum mobile.

It may regain some energy when the car brakes, but you still have to plug-in your hybrid into a wall socket to charge up the batteries, or burn gasoline to charge up the batteries.
 
Pete Letkeman
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It has also been reported, I'm not sure it if true, that it takes a lot of time/energy and unique raw materials which can be hard to locate/mine to create a battery which is used in an electric car or hybrid.
I believe that only years after we get into alternative fuels like solar and wind to power our transportation needs that we may see the clear/clean air.
Even though hybrids have been around for ten plus years, there are still plenty of other vehicles, some new some old, on the road which don't use this technology.
 
Liutauras Vilda
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Jesper de Jong wrote:It may regain some energy when the car brakes, but you still have to plug-in your hybrid into a wall socket to charge up the batteries, or burn gasoline to charge up the batteries.

You sound to be knowing those things quite well.

However, few weeks back I had to use taxi services for an entire week or more every single day, few times a day. Absolutely all taxis came to me were Toyota Prius. So after several such cars I was surprised, how come all Toyota's Prius.

So I started question one driver. He said it is very cheap running costs comparing to other cars, you don't need to charge as you do for instance Tesla cars or other older generation electric cars.

But here is what I found on Toyota's blog, basically all explained. I think you are quite right Jesper, but not quite sure if in full (I need to read this article well to understand better). In some sentences they state:
Toyota wrote:The battery is kept well charged by the system, so a Hybrid Synergy Drive-equipped Toyota won’t need to be plugged into a mains supply to be recharged. However, Toyota does produce the Prius Plug-in for people who can make use of its greater range of more than 30 miles in electric-only EV mode – this type of vehicle is a ‘Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle’ (PHEV) that can use mains power to supplement the onboard charging system, but still has the petrol engine so you’ve no worries about its range.


Campbell Ritchie wrote:I did once read that a hybrid's miles per gallon is hardly better than pure petrol.

Well, the same taxi driver said: - "it is the cheapest way to work as a taxi driver in nowadays". In this case I'd trust more taxi driver. Their business to earn money, I think they seek for fuel efficiency more than everybody else.

Campbell Ritchie wrote:If you had tried that in 1975, it would have been much much worse. I remember it well.

Horses don't produce gas stuff
 
Tim Moores
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Liutauras Vilda wrote:Horses don't produce gas stuff

They sure do: methane, like all animals, which is a much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2.
 
Liutauras Vilda
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Tim Moores wrote:
Liutauras Vilda wrote:Horses don't produce gas stuff

They sure do: methane, like all animals, which is a much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2.



Of course you are right!
 
Jesper de Jong
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At least where I live, driving an electric car is much cheaper per kilometer / mile than a gasoline car, because electricity is very cheap compared to gasoline (if you compare them by amount of energy that each contains).

I'm planning on putting solar panels on my roof at home, and I'm waiting for the new all-electric cars that many manufacturers will be introducing in the coming years. Of course there's Tesla, which now has the model 3 out, but many other manufacturers have already announced that they will be introducing new all-electric models. Some of them (such as Volvo) have even announced that in a few years time they will no longer be producing gasoline-only cars, they're switching to hybrids and all-electric.

So, I'm going to keep my current car (a gasoline car) for a few more years and then see what the new all-electric cars are going to be like. When I have solar panels, I will be able to drive clean and cheap.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Liutauras Vilda wrote:. . . it is the cheapest way to work as a taxi driver in nowadays . . .
Obviously things have changed. Of course, a hybrid doesn't pay the congestion charge.
Horses don't produce gas stuff
Except for police horses, they had all been scared off London streets long before that
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Jesper de Jong wrote:. . . solar panels on my roof . . .
Consider a battery as well, to keep the supply going whenever there is a cloud overhead. Or in winter, when the battery can be charged on low‑rate electricity at 3.00o'clock.
 
Randy Maddocks
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Bear Bibeault wrote:Result: higher prices. Which, of course, lower back to equilibrium much slower than they raise. 


Ain't that the truth!!!  
 
Jesper de Jong
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:
Jesper de Jong wrote:. . . solar panels on my roof . . .
Consider a battery as well, to keep the supply going whenever there is a cloud overhead. Or in winter, when the battery can be charged on low‑rate electricity at 3.00o'clock.

In the Netherlands, when you have solar panels but at some moment you use less electricity than the panels provide, the excess electricity is fed back into the main grid. The energy company will pay you for the energy you are supplying to the grid, so you still benefit from your solar panels. So, a battery is not really needed here at the moment - but the rules may change in the future, so it might become beneficial to have a battery at some point in the future.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Jesper de Jong wrote:. . . when . . . you use less electricity than the panels provide, the . . . energy company will pay you for the energy you are supplying . . .
If it is anything like on this side of the Channel, the payment you receive for electricity supplied to the grid is much less than what you pay for electricity from the grid, so it is still worth finding out about batteries. The most economical thing to do with electricity generated is use it yourself because you benefit from the general generation payment as well as a reduction in your bills.
There are new kinds of solar panel other than the square panels in aluminium frames; it is even possible to buy flexible panels which stick to the roof tiles. I don't know any more than that.
 
Paul Clapham
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Friends of mine live in Glasgow, which as you know is quite far north and is not known for its sunny weather. You wouldn't think it would be an ideal site for solar panels, but nevertheless they have installed solar panels on their roof, which isn't even oriented in the ideal direction for solar energy collection. I don't know whether they ever reduce their energy usage to zero and feed energy back into the grid, but they still expect to pay off the price of the panels and installation within just a few years from the savings on electricity costs.

I believe there is some kind of government subsidy involved in their panels, though. You might know more about that, Campbell.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Paul Clapham wrote:. . . Glasgow
Which is about 150 miles from here.
. . . isn't even oriented in the ideal direction
Ours aren't oriented right either. The ideal direction might not be south, but south‑east, because you are more likely to get a completely clear sky in the morning.
. . . whether they ever reduce their energy usage to zero and feed energy back into the grid . . .
Except in the darkest parts of Winter we can always reduce our consumption to zero and feed back power for several hours daily. The fridge and a laptop and nothing else running will use 200W or less (intermittently), and the panels will produce that on a sunny day even at Christmas. The hard part is keeping zero consumption during all daylight hours and still running the immersion heater (3kW). If your friends have a two‑dial meter they can confirm that from the readings.
I believe there is some kind of government subsidy . . .
Yes, “sustainable” power is subsidised.
 
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