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Fake emotion while speaking

 
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There is this woman who does commercials on the radio here who has such a phoney emotional voice. For example she says "an avalanche of taxes" like it is exciting or sexy.
 
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That's called "acting", isn't it? Some people get paid a lot of money to do that.
 
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I notice that sometimes when news reporters are talking about technology topics. They put emphasis in all the wrong places which says to me that they really don't understand the words they're speaking.

I suppose that's the job of a news reporter though, to deliver the news, all news. Perhaps the same is true for other topics also but because I don't understand the topic I don't notice it either.
 
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In some instances, emphasis in the wrong place means they don't believe the words they are reading.
 
Randall Twede
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Now I hadn't thought of that Campbell
 
Campbell Ritchie
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It was in the newspapers about twenty years ago.
 
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This is somewhat off-topic, but this reminded me of something that really annoys me about commercials, specifically food commercials.

An example of a description of a hamburger:

Advertisement: "Fresh, Grade-A, grass-fed beef topped with crisp, sliced lettuce and ripe tomato with a special sauce wrapped around an oven-toasted bun."

Reality (how it should be described based on what you generally get): "Something passing as meat with limpy lettuce and mushy tomato with way too much of some kind of white "goop" on top, covered by a stale, damp bun, which has been sitting under a heat lamp for who-knows-how-long."

It just annoys me when they say "fresh" tomato...as opposed to what, tomato that has been sitting in some dark, dank back room for weeks??? "Crisp" lettuce...as opposed to wimpy lettuce??? Do they really believe it will make a difference to consumers if they don't add those adjectives in their ads??

Still, with all the problems in the world, if this is what annoys me, I guess I need to get a life.......

My apologies for "post bombing".
 
Randall Twede
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i once watched a McDonalds truck unloading. they had boxes of pre-sliced tomatoes and pre-chopped celery. now how fresh can that be?
 
It's exactly the same and completely different as this tiny ad:
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