Win a copy of Pragmatic AI this week in the Artificial Intelligence forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Tim Cooke
  • Bear Bibeault
Sheriffs:
  • Paul Clapham
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Knute Snortum
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Ganesh Patekar
  • Tim Moores
  • Pete Letkeman
  • Stephan van Hulst
Bartenders:
  • Carey Brown
  • Tim Holloway
  • Joe Ess

Boot, Core, etc, so where to begin?  RSS feed

 
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 1817
75
Android Chrome IntelliJ IDE Java MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Spring is vast and encompassing. What's the best course of action for learning? Maybe this depends on the person, so about me.
I'm a developer, I've spent about 15 years programing in ASP Classic/VBScript. I know some C# and ASP.Net. About a year ago I became SAP Hana SPS 11 certified. In September I became 1Z0-808 certified. I know SQL to a degree, more precisely MySQL's version of SQL. I know a bit about Android development and I've breifly experimented with Kotlin.
How should I go about learning Spring? I'm not too concerned about certification right now.
 
Pete Letkeman
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 1817
75
Android Chrome IntelliJ IDE Java MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've also experimented with ASP.NET MVC3 and ASP.NET MVC4 and created a view sites using that technology. Thus the MVC model/theory is not a new concept to me.
Aside from all that I am not exactly a beginner when it comes to Linux, but by no means and am I an expect. I know just enough to get by on some systems some times.
 
Rancher
Posts: 965
9
Java Linux Spring
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you can afford it or can get it paid for then I'll say the Pivotal courses, possibly the Core Spring one.  The thing about these courses is that they are taught by the actual Pivotal developers and not just some third party or academic. 

I'll start with the official documentation, since its always been very good Spring Docs

Since your new to the technology but not the industry, you will find a lot of similarities in particular the common use of design patterns.  Guess you could start with the core spring, favouring Java configuration and then move onto more advanced technologies like Spring MVC.      

Personally I don't think you can learn every part of the framework, since its so vast.  However for the most part spring operates in a similar way across many different technologies (templates and then even more templates!).    



 
 
Pete Letkeman
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 1817
75
Android Chrome IntelliJ IDE Java MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Pete.

I was wondering because I read an exert from Spring Boot in Action and while you get started creating a web site almost right away there is some talk about Spring Core and Spring Security with links to other books about those topics.

I will defiantly looks at the documentation that you have suggested, but I do not think that I'll be able to take the Pivotal courses due to prior financial obligations.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 80
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Here is a Spring Boot series of tutorials to get you started Spring Boot tutorial
 
Pete Letkeman
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 1817
75
Android Chrome IntelliJ IDE Java MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Tim.

I know that there are plenty of tutorials out there for Spring, Spring Boot and other Spring areas. Spring even has some walk through projects on the guide portion of it's web site.
Currently I have more then enough tutorials to get me going and when I run into problems I'll Google for a solution before posting.

Thanks once again Tim.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!