Win a copy of Five Lines of Code this week in the OO, Patterns, UML and Refactoring forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Ron McLeod
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Paul Clapham
Sheriffs:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Junilu Lacar
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • fred rosenberger
  • salvin francis
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven
  • Carey Brown

Advices on finding my first full time Java Backend developer job

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 30
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I know Java 8, Java EE (Servlet, JSP and Spring), Hibernate, JUnit, Gradle, GIT, Kotlin, JavaScript, MySQL and probably some other stuff too.
Java 8 is what i know most about (Have known Java since version 1.5).
I have no work experience. And i am trying to find a good job.
The current step that i am thinking of taking is to create a project(s) and publish it(them) to github.
However, I don't know of what should i include in this project and what shouldn't i include.
For example, i am not familiar with microservices (I have read online about it but, never actually created such a system). Should i start attempting to learn microservices before attempting to upload some code to github, or should i just write what i already know (a big monolithic web app).
What are my odds to land a job as a java backend developer for both cases?
Considering that i don't like to remain unemployed (Learning microservices/or-similar-new-technologies before landing a job or uploading code to github).
How do i rate myself? Junior? mid?
 
Marshal
Posts: 67418
173
Mac Mac OS X IntelliJ IDE jQuery Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My opinion is that it would be better have working projects than spend time learning yet another technology niche.

How could you rate yourself as anything other than entry level with no work experience?
 
Toni Lane
Ranch Hand
Posts: 30
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bear Bibeault wrote:My opinion is that it would be better have working projects than spend time learning yet another technology niche.

How could you rate yourself as anything other than entry level with no work experience?


ok, thank you.
Any other advices?
 
Bartender
Posts: 1868
81
Android IntelliJ IDE MySQL Database Chrome Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Toni Lane wrote:The current step that i am thinking of taking is to create a project(s) and publish it(them) to github.


This is a great step for anyone/everyone. GitHub is free and you can use it to show what you know. It's probably best not to have too many uncompleted projects.

Toni Lane wrote:Should i start attempting to learn microservices before attempting to upload some code to github,


I think so, as there is no right answer to this. However knowing and having one or two working examples can be helpful.

Toni Lane wrote:should i just write what i already know (a big monolithic web app).


I think that many people are hearing the word/phrase micro service and are trying that out for now and trying to break things down into more usable parts.
I remember hearing (I don't have the source for this) that Netflix use to have one large monolithic which would take about 40 minutes to start.
Netflix decided that this was not the best, so continually broke down this monolith and now they are using some micro services.

You have some knowledge in many different areas, what if you put that all together?
You could use you Java 8, MySQL, Spring (what about Spring Boot?) and Kotlin along with your other skills to make some sort of project which showcases them all.
Then you can show that you can coordinate services and software across a few different areas.

For instance you could do something like this:
  • Write some software which uses a web/rest interface which:
  • Could read in cooking recipes
  • Finds the ingredients at the store(s) closet to you
  • Provides a shopping list
  • Make an app, you know Kotlin, you can do this in Android?
  • Provide routes using Google maps

  • The idea is to take a project, either not out there yet, or to be improved upon and make it happen.
    This will work better if you are interested in the subject matter.
    Maybe you can create a project about the city you live in/near or movies, books or cars.

    If you do want an introduction into Spring Boot 2 and micro services that you may want to check out
    Learning Spring Boot 2.0 - Second Edition: Simplify the development of lightning fast applications based on microservices and reactive programming
    by Greg L. Turnquis first published in November 2017.
    I recently went through that resource and I found it helpful.

    Toni Lane wrote:What are my odds to land a job as a java backend developer for both cases?


    Too many unknowns for any valid answer.
    For instance (sample questions that you should ask yourself):
  • Are willing to relocate to a different city, state, country?
  • Are you looking at becoming a contractor or would you like to be a full time employee?
  • Are you looking for a job where you can move up the corporate ladder?
  • And the list goes on

  • Plus there are factors which are out of your control such as:
  • What companies are hiring (either publicly or privately).
  • What the job market is for where you want to live/work.
  • And the list goes on

  • Toni Lane wrote:How do i rate myself? Junior? mid?


    If you do not have too much experience then most people would probably classify you as entry level or possibly junior.
    It all kind of depends on your years of experience as to what people classify you as.
     
    Toni Lane
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 30
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Thanks a lot, Pete
    I'll start working on it.
     
    Pete Letkeman
    Bartender
    Posts: 1868
    81
    Android IntelliJ IDE MySQL Database Chrome Java
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    You are welcome.
    As for front end vs back end. I suggest that you keep things simple when you are programming.

    I know that design is not for everyone, but there are free open source designs out there which you can use. I'd suggest that were possible you add in design/colors/images at the end.
    Be sure to give credit for the design where it's due and let your potential employer know that you would rather the back end instead of the front end so they know what to expect.
     
    Toni Lane
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 30
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator

    Pete Letkeman wrote:You are welcome.
    As for front end vs back end. I suggest that you keep things simple when you are programming.

    I know that design is not for everyone, but there are free open source designs out there which you can use. I'd suggest that were possible you add in design/colors/images at the end.
    Be sure to give credit for the design where it's due and let your potential employer know that you would rather the back end instead of the front end so they know what to expect.


    Sure, ill take that into consideration.
     
    what if we put solar panels on top of the semi truck trailer? That could power this tiny ad:
    Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
    https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
      Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic