Win a copy of Pipeline as Code this week in the Cloud/Virtualization forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Ron McLeod
  • Paul Clapham
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Bear Bibeault
Sheriffs:
  • Rob Spoor
  • Henry Wong
  • Liutauras Vilda
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Carey Brown
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Piet Souris
Bartenders:
  • Frits Walraven
  • Himai Minh
  • Jj Roberts

Any reason to learn in earlier versions of Java?

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 31
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I know the Python community has a bit of a rift over Python 2 vs 3.  Is there anything like that in Java?  Are there any advantages at all to starting in something other than the latest?
 
Saloon Keeper
Posts: 8008
70
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database VI Editor Java Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would suggest not using anything older than Java-8. Java-8 added some major language changes that, even if you don't use today, you may find that you need it to run example code that takes advantage of them. Java-8 is also the last version to support Windows 32bit if that makes any difference.
 
author & internet detective
Posts: 40521
825
Eclipse IDE VI Editor Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Scott,
You should start with Java 8 or 11. (Both are long term support versions.) Java 8 is available for download for another 2 years. (Or a few months if you want to use it in production.)

The only reason I can think of to start with Java 8 is if you have a Java 8 book or want to take the cert exam. Otherwise, start with 11.

That said, Java is backward compatible (mostly.) It's not like the Python 2/3 split! So what you learn in 8 will still apply to 11 if you go that route.
 
Author
Posts: 12
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I know the Python community has a bit of a rift over Python 2 vs 3.  Is there anything like that in Java?  Are there any advantages at all to starting in something other than the latest?



Python version 3 is not compatible with Python 2. This actually makes that change very different from the change of Java. Java is mainly backward compatible.

As for learning Java I recommend that you start to learn Java 11 and if you face a project that uses Java 8 or -- God forbid -- Java 6 then you will learn what NOT to use. You may face some old legacy code that uses Java 6, but they will run fine with newer versions of Java, unlike Python 2 code that fails many times on a Python 3 interpreter.
 
Of course, I found a very beautiful couch. Definitely. And this tiny ad:
SKIP - a book about connecting industrious people with elderly land owners
https://coderanch.com/t/skip-book
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic