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Gas cooker  RSS feed

 
Marshal
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When I go anywhere near cooker, I always ask my wife which control belongs to which cooking unit, or if she's angry, I check myself the references (marked them in orange). And she always complains how I can't remember them.

Well, today I decided to take a picture and share it with you all.

Would you easily remember this pattern? Why this cooker is so weird? Is yours similar? I simply can't find rationale behind the pattern, and the fact that cooker is integrated rotating it 90 degrees, meaning controls aren't looking directly to you doesn't help either.
liutauras_cooker.jpg
[Thumbnail for liutauras_cooker.jpg]
 
Bartender
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I wouldn't call it conventional. Most stove tops I've seen that lay out their knobs in a linear fashion are ordered by reading order of the burners.

However, after using the stove top you've shown, I would probably remember it after using it two times simply by "clockwise starting from bottom right".
 
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I think it's either a right-handed stove designed for left-handed people or a left-handed stove designed for right-handed people. Or a stove that expects people will be moving cookware onto the burners with one hand and simultaneously manipulating the heat level with the other.

Because if you do everything with your dominant hand and prefer the larger hobs, the knob most likely used is the one farthest from the burner you place the cooking on.

At least the controls are in front. I live in an area where gas cooking is basically impossible and the control knobs on the range are placed behind the burner elements. You have to reach over a hot element to control it.

Not only that, but the knobs are close enough to the heat that I ended up having to replace one, since it melted.
 
Stephan van Hulst
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Oh wait I only just noticed how the top is rotated. Ignore my last post then.

Tim, knobs behind the burners? Now that just makes me angry.
 
Master Rancher
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Come on, Liutauras, what's the problem?

All that is required is an enum Position {TOPLEFT, et cetera} and a HashMap<Integer, Position>.
 
Stephan van Hulst
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If there are no gaps between the indices of the positions, just use a List
 
Marshal
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It would take me twenty minutes to learn what the icons next to each knob mean, and twenty seconds to forget it.  Oven rings is one of the classic examples of bad design in Norman's book. My Missus is far better at turning the right knobs than I am. That means, whenever the wrong gas lights, she simply turns it off and keeps quiet about it whereas I complain about bad design.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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How can you rotate a cooker hob? I thought they had shaped lugs to make them only fit one way round.
Actually, that is a better design of hob; since nobody can remember which knob works which ring, you always have to look at the knobs, which means you never get dinner before 8.30 
 
Tim Holloway
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Stephan van Hulst wrote:
Tim, knobs behind the burners? Now that just makes me angry.



It's tolerable for regular cooking, but when I started playing with a pressure cooker, it got seriously scary. The PC is likely to let off live steam at and moment, and especially if you bump the valve while reaching beyond it to adjust the heat.

I've since acquired a small Instant Pot. I put it off for a long while, since I've long since run out of kitchen storage space and there's no function it provides that I don't already have generally 2 of, but it featured a yoghurt setting and someday I may even try it. In the mean time, it's been nice to have pressure cooking that doesn't make alarming noises every few minutes and can be left alone to make soup, rice, beans, etc. while I'm tending to business.

 
Liutauras Vilda
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Tim Holloway wrote:I think it's either a right-handed stove designed for left-handed people or a left-handed stove designed for right-handed people.


I wouldn't imagine naturally that such concepts even exist, but technically could be, mainly for those who spend a good amount of time by the cooker.

Stephan van Hulst wrote:Oh wait I only just noticed how the top is rotated.


Yeah, these controls aren't going clockwise neither anti-clockwise, it is some kind of hybrid pattern. That's the thing, having the cooker itself integrated rotating it 90 degrees, not even clear what is the top of it, real top when you stand in front of it (by leaving knobs on your right), or the left side which would be the top looking from the knobs side. I find myself tilting my head when reading knobs references, so I guess I treating left side as the top. It must be fitted that way because of maybe were not enough height in a table frame. I'm renting this flat for past 3 or 4 years now, so really don't know.

Campbell Ritchie wrote:How can you rotate a cooker hob?


I too think it is a defective which landlord maybe got with a good discount.

Piet Souris wrote:All that is required is an enum Position {TOPLEFT, et cetera} and a HashMap<Integer, Position>


My wife would say I might need a break if start that way


For those who confused about the picture: the actual position you are standing at is the left side of the picture (the perspective you see now is the table basically, which I was leaning onto), so these control knobs technically can be operated only with the right-hand side when you stand in front of the cooker.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Liutauras Vilda wrote:. . . landlord maybe got with a good discount.

But you live in London, so you can't go for a discount on the rent. Go to Brixton and for only one week's rent where you live, you can hire a hitman to rub your landlord out.

Piet Souris wrote:All that is required is an enum Position {TOPLEFT, et cetera} and a HashMap<Integer, Position>

Most women in my family can't remember where left and right are.
 
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Stephan van Hulst wrote:Tim, knobs behind the burners? Now that just makes me angry.


I think it is pretty common on electric stoves to put all the controls on a panel at the back.

 
Stephan van Hulst
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Right, I think I recall the type. It kind of looks like an elevated 'control panel', yeah?
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Ron McLeod wrote:. . . it is pretty common on electric stoves to put all the controls on a panel at the back. . . .

At least on a gas hob you can see the flames when you turn the wrong ring on. Electric hobs have exactly the same knob location problem.
 
Tim Holloway
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Stephan van Hulst wrote:Right, I think I recall the type. It kind of looks like an elevated 'control panel', yeah?



Yep. All the wiring comes up through the back from the mains and gets switched at the panel before being distributed out to the various heating elements and oven lamp. Clocks/oven timers have been pretty much standard since the days when they ran on electric motors as well. Although only higher-end units actually control anything with a timer.

I think that I've seen glass-top units with forward controls, but I don't spend much time looking at those. I have concerns about slamming some of my heavier cast-iron pots and pans on a glass surface, shockproof or otherwise. And, ironically, it's my understanding that the glass-top units don't have heat in the elements, only via induction in the cookware so there's less reach-over danger.

An electric burner can get a nice cherry-red glow when turned up high enough, but waving a hand over the element is usually sufficient indication of which burner you switched on.

I have occasionally used the wrong switch, but not often.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Tim Holloway wrote:. . . waving a hand over the element is usually sufficient indication of which burner you switched on. . . .

Only if you have the patience to stand there while the ring heats up.
 
Tim Holloway
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:

Tim Holloway wrote:. . . waving a hand over the element is usually sufficient indication of which burner you switched on. . . .

Only if you have the patience to stand there while the ring heats up.



There is a mystique about gas versus electric that gas is instant and electric is not. Well, maybe with the old fat elements, but certainly not with anything made in the last 30 years or more.

It's the same sort of nonsense that says Americans don't use an electric kettle because 120V isn't powerful enough. A 1kw kettle is a 1KW kettle, whether it draws 10A at 100V or 5A at 200V. And it's the watts that translates into heat.

We just use microwaves because they're more convenient. It's already on the countertop. I do have an electric kettle, but I usually don't bother to haul it out.
 
Liutauras Vilda
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Tim Holloway wrote:There is a mystique about gas versus electric that gas is instant and electric is not.


I wouldn't say it is a mystique. Flame is indeed instant. It gets its peak heat instantly. Electric one must be go up gradually. The time it takes to "go up" changed of course in the past 30 years. I'd be surprised if an electric one produces the same high heat.

About the microwaves is a one downside, not sure if you ever noticed, but the food gets cold way quicker than warmed up in a simple frying pan. I think that's because microwave doesn't heat food equally. Well, in my family we are trying to use it as less as possible. My wife still believes that food warmed up in a microwave is not good for your health. I don't know what scientists say about that, how much truth is in that, if at all.
 
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Liutauras Vilda wrote:My wife still believes that food warmed up in a microwave is not good for your health.  

I also thought the same and asked my family members not to use it but later i thought to search about it then i found WHO: Microwave ovens-Food safety Section

World Health Organization wrote:Food cooked in a microwave oven is as safe, and has the same nutrient value, as food cooked in a conventional oven.  



Liutauras Vilda wrote:I don't know what scientists say about that, how much truth is in that, if at all.

Even after reading what WHO says, somewhere in mind I've a doubt about it hence i avoid using that and asks others too. I also read it's radiations are not good for pregnant ladies so asked to check leakage regularly.
 
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A simple solution : Color code them
Get some label stickers or similar and stick them on each gas nob. Voila !! No more confusion !
Even more useful would be to use reflective stickers like the ones we stick on bi-cycles. No more confusion in the dark too !!
 
Tim Holloway
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The bulk of the delay in heating on a cooker for me isn't the time spent heating the elements, it's the time spent heating the pot, skillet, or whatever. The extra overhead in heating the element is pretty small, considering that the element will be at full temperature long before the cooking vessel is.

Microwaves do, in fact, cook unevenly, as anyone who's popped a frozen dinner in only to find it still frozen in spots. But heating tea is heating a homogeneous fluid. And microwaves do their magic by heating the water in food, so in the case of a hot cuppa, you're not likely to find "cold" pockets - at least that can stand having a bag dunked in them.

I heard a Hallowe'en nightmare story yesterday. A Brit was recounting how a friend had popped a mug with teabag straight into the microwave. His friends were all horrified.

Actually, I was too, but that's because the staple in the bag would spark (I don't even want to think about the bags with glue), and microwaved paper isn't going to make it any better.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Tim Holloway wrote:. . . a friend had popped a mug with teabag straight into the microwave. His friends were all horrified. . .

Yes, even over here, there are people totally clueless about tea
 
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That pattern is really a puzzle for my brain too Liutaras ; what stove interface i had design? i split up the knobs : 2 on the left side and  2 on the right side with correspondence knob- burner 1 to 1  
 
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Liutauras Vilda wrote:When I go anywhere near cooker, I always ask my wife which control belongs to which cooking unit...



If it makes you feel any better Liutauras I installed our cooktop stove (the kind that is just a flat "glass" surface with embedded elements) about 5 years ago and to this day every time I go to use it I have to stand over it for a few moments to figure out which button is for which element.    
 
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My head just hurts looking at that image.

The back burners are the nobs at the extremities.

The front burners are the nobs in the middle.

The right burners are at the top.

The left ones are at the bottom.

But WHYYYYYYYYYYYYYY???      

Edit: Looking at it further, I notice that the nobs go big burner, small burner, big burner, small burner. At least there's that pattern. And, if one is standing at the oven, it's clock-wise from the big right back burner. Why they arranged it that way, the world may never know...
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Nicole Alderman wrote:. . .  Why they arranged it that way . . .

I thought we had a allegation from Stephan that somebody has rotated the hob.
 
Harry Kar
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Nicole Alderman wrote:... Why they arranged it that way, the world may never know...



The only plausible reason i can think off is they have blind copy product's implementation in their product's interface in other words they haven't spend even 1 second about product's interface design
 
Greenhorn
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That's the biggest mysteries for us men.
 
Greenhorn
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If this is designed by a man, he must've been a god at reading women right.
We have 2 ovens at home, 1 simple digital one, and this complex weird one with a rotating button that can be pushed in, pulled out and who knows what magic tricks doing all kind of different functions and settings.

My wife understands that weird one and doesn't get the digital one. I understand the simple one but feel lost at the complex weird one to me.
 
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