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Download CSV file header is gets junk when Japanese language selected in Linux server  RSS feed

 
Greenhorn
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When we download CSV file from Linux server using java code header value is gets junk for Japanese language.
It is working fine when run on window platform.
Following is my sample code.



Here, label 1, label 2 etc are in two language(English,Japanese). When we select English then working fine in both environment(Linux,Window).
But when we select Japanese it is working fine in window only, not working in Linux.
What is wrong in the code or is there any other way solve this issue?
 
Greenhorn
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Linux and Windows use different character encoding systems by default. (https://superuser.com/questions/294219/what-are-the-differences-between-linux-and-windows-txt-files-unicode-encoding)

In short, Linux usually defaults to using UTF-8 encoding, which is fine for latin scripts, but can't represent Japanese (because 8 bits isn't enough to represent all the characters in the language). The reason you get giberrish, is that at some point when it takes the larger unit data and converts it to UTF-8 (or some other smaller encoding type) automatically, it is simply discarding all the information in the extra bits.

This could be an issue with the program you are using to display data on Linux (in which case the code is fine). Have you tried copying the data file you generate on the Linux system and trying to display it on a Windows machine? If this turns out to be the problem, you need to change the settings of whatever program you are displaying data with on Linux.

Otherwise, if it is a code issue, there is likely to be a setting somewhere in CSVConfig (I've never used that library, so you would have to check the documentation) to make sure it is using UTF-16 Unicode (rather than the system default). You would need to make sure the program is using the correct (i.e. larger) encoding system so that it can handle Japanese characters.
 
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Jimmy Robov wrote:In short, Linux usually defaults to using UTF-8 encoding, which is fine for latin scripts, but can't represent Japanese (because 8 bits isn't enough to represent all the characters in the language). The reason you get giberrish, is that at some point when it takes the larger unit data and converts it to UTF-8 (or some other smaller encoding type) automatically, it is simply discarding all the information in the extra bits.



Actually UTF-8 is specifically designed so that it can encode all scripts, including the CJK scripts which Japanese uses. The actual reason that you don't see the correct data is that something is making an incorrect assumption about the encoding being used by the download and hence using the wrong encoding to write the file.

So your code coincidentally happens to work correctly with the Windows server because the DownloadUtils.download() method copies the data in the correct encoding. Possibly that's because the Windows server uses the encoding which you expect the output file to have. My approach would be, for a start, to ensure that the Windows and Unix servers use the same encoding for the download you are using.

I assume that the client code is always running on the same machine, and it's only the servers which run on different operating systems. If the client code works differently on Windows and Unix machines as well, that's another possible source of problems.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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