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So... What 1 college course did you take that you value most?  RSS feed

 
Ranch Hand
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For me?  Graph theory.  It's amazing how many problems can be solved with graph theory.  Second?  Discrete math.

If memory serves you don't need calculus for either of these, just algebra.  Then again, I was a math major with 10+ years experience programming (BASIC, z-80 assembly, then C) by the time I ran across them.  Graph theory was an immediate eye opener, Discrete math much more subtle.  I learned basic algorithm and O theory on my own, long before I realized being self taught meant "nobody is going to hire you without a piece of paper"

What say you?
 
Saloon Keeper
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The ones that provided a completely different view of things - in college that was a class on functional and logic programming, introducing us to Scheme and Prolog. In grad school, it was one about neural networks. Those provided new ways of thinking about problems that have been useful ever since.
 
Bartender
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Not one in particular, but courses that stand out for me are Functional Programming, Cryptography, Discrete Mathematics (which included graph theory), Linear Algebra, Calculus and Embedded Systems.

I also was a big fan of Compiler Design, but I didn't learn much new stuff from it by the time it was taught.
 
Bartender
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A class on Logic.  I was never good at math and had little interest in computers (There was no JavaRanch in 1990 to help us noobs!).  I was taking a lot of electives in anthropology and philosophy, so I signed up for a course in Logic thinking it would be about Rhetoric.  That's where it started, but it quickly moved on to Mathematical logic like Boolean logic and formal proofs.  For some reason, probably because it wasn't presented as boring old numerical "math", everything clicked into place and it opened up a whole new path for me.  I finished my Bachelor's degree in Literature and wound up getting a second Bachelor's degree in Computer Science thanks to that class.  
 
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Electronic1(analogic circuits) was the first time we used a software emulator (SPICE back then wasn't opensource but our prof gave us a floppy and we copy it) (the res tof the course continued with no labs only from book ) in 3rd year and Eectronic2(digital circuits) in 4th
In propedeutics(1st and 2nd year) i liked my first course on CS (with Pascal on elemental DS + relative algos was a tough exam i remember i did it 2-3 times before pass it), Physics and Calulus1 and 2 and also Operational research
 
Master Rancher
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A course about multivariate normal distributions. It was very, very elegant theory. No computer programming involved in my study. Four years ago I followed the Coursera course about Scala. It was very very elegant as well, with functions that acted as parameters. Unbelievable, never saw that before.
 
Rancher
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Well, I am going back 32 years since I graduated college, but I will never forget my financial and statistical analysis course. I surprised myself by finding out I really liked working with formulas containing things like present value (PV), future value (FV), compounded interest, etc...or, figuring out median, mean, mode, range...Also having a really good instructor added to the enjoyment.

Have rarely used it since, but still, loved the course.
 
Harry Kar
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Sorry guys someone request my opinion on that "mixed" course https://www.mona.uwi.edu/physics/bsc-electronics-and-computer-science made in Jamaica ;
I'm too old and to my eyes seems a great mess. My first degree was in EE and then in later years had to do with CS and CE ;
My opinion is EE and CS are totally and definitely  unrelated fields and l don't guess in Jamaica exist a second Silicon Valley(but just in case i can't find the same a common place trough EE and CS)  

What you think about?
 
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