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Create numbers in a sequential order  RSS feed

 
Ranch Hand
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Hi everyone. I am new to Java and not even sure it can accomplish what I am trying to do. I have been asked to try to come up with a web based program that will create numbers in a sequential order....IE: 001, 002, 003.....upon every press of a button. I need these numbers to be able to be stored so that the next time someone else loads this up and presses the button, it will produce the next number in the sequence. It also has to work across many workstations and users. Is this even possible? Or should I look at another option? I thought Java might be the best option, seeing how easy it is to implement into HTML. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
Saloon Keeper
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Yes, a web app can do this if it persists the number, and also considers concurrency.

Any of a number of languages could be used for this. Whether Java is the right choice depends on a lot of factors that we know nothing about.

I thought Java might be the best option, seeing how easy it is to implement into HTML.


I don't understand what you're trying to say here. What's the connection between Java and HTML?
 
Marshal
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It is easy enough to have a sequence of numbers, but there is no such thing as the number 001. There is only the number 1. It is possible to create a String “001” from it, but that is something different.
 
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Tim Moores wrote:

I thought Java might be the best option, seeing how easy it is to implement into HTML.


I don't understand what you're trying to say here. What's the connection between Java and HTML?



I think the op confuses java with javaScript
 
Daniel Demesmaecker
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In javaScript it would be actually easier to do. If all it has to do is keeping a counter you could save it to localStorage.
With java you would need some kind of external storage, a db, a textfile or something
 
Tim Moores
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Daniel Demesmaecker wrote:If all it has to do is keeping a counter you could save it to localStorage.



That seems to conflict with this requirement:

It also has to work across many workstations and users.

 
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Tim Moores wrote:
That seems to conflict with this requirement:

It also has to work across many workstations and users.



I'm taking it that you're thinking many "servers", but I believe that "workstations" means clients. As long as there's only one webserver, keeping a value in an Application Scope object for a JEE webapp is perfectly fine. At least until the system is restarted. At which point it's best if that value was also kept reliably updated in a nonvolatile storage such as a database.
 
Greenhorn
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Hi,
I am totally new to Java as well, and totally new to this forum.
But if I can offer a naive guess?

Java is a program/object based creating code, and can only run in a dedicated environment. It has a lot of limitations these days when it comes to running that code inside browsers/HTML. Many browsers no longer support Java applets running in them which is the environment required to express Java programs. So I think you may have to create this logging/counting program to reside on a server and have it referenced by the client side computer/workstation browsers.

I am not sure of the coding you would need to make the connection between client and server. To actually embed the code within browsers you might need a more compatible scripting language like Javascript? maybe that could accomplish the calculations you need on the fly with the updates and to run on multiple workstations.
I am not very experienced and so I am really really sorry if this information is ignorant. It just seems that you might be very limited in terms of the implementation of a program written in Java in terms of where it ultimately resides and runs and how it is invoked.

I hope this helps.

cliff
 
Tim Moores
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Tim Holloway wrote:I'm taking it that you're thinking many "servers", but I believe that "workstations" means clients.


That's how I interpreted it as well. I replied to the mention of "localStorage", which is a JavaScript client-side concept and clearly will not do.
 
Greenhorn
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You could get a spring boot app to do this up and running in minutes and you wouldn't need to install tomcat.

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