Win a copy of Java XML & JSON this week in the XML and Related Technologies forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Bear Bibeault
Sheriffs:
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Paul Clapham
  • Knute Snortum
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • salvin francis
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Tim Holloway
  • Frits Walraven
  • Ganesh Patekar

How dead is Java?  RSS feed

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 462
Chrome Linux VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I learn from my mistakes.  A popular website is now asking how dead is java.  Never mind they say it's the second most popular language after Javascript.

Subby's notes.  I've learned a lot of languages over the past 40 years.  BASIC, assembler (z-80, 8086, 6502, 68000, yadda yadda) C, awk, sed, perl, python, ADA (try writing a device driver when you have no access to the hardware), and we won't mention the AMD 2900 bit slice stuff on this forum (google Mick & Brick if you care, but the most fun I've ever had was programming it), tcl/tk, and yeah, Java.   Some I liked (bit slice was a blast), some was just Getting Stuff Done, some was You Have To Be Kidding (tm).

The one language I hate?  javascript.  I have never before, nor since, thought a language was actively hostile to me.  Program works on your machine?  Shoot it to production, they installed JS with different options and things failed.  No errors mind you, just wrong results.  Wasn't just me, there were 5-10 of us at the time, we all had the same problem.  Granted, this was 20 years ago.  But the burn hasn't healed, and I will never again accept a job that requires JS.

Ahh, the ADA thing.  Early drafts did not allow hardware access (think 1990 or so).  I wrote sonar software for the Seawolf submarine.  I was talking to a DSP board where I had to not only set pointers to registers, but set/clear specific bits.  The ADA spec at the time did not allow for that kind of thing.  Not to mention compilers at the time were slower than snail snot.  We got a waiver to write our code in C.  I don't hate ADA, I'd kinda like to see what it's like today.  But my experience, 30 years ago when it was brand spankin new, was not good.

I retired some 6 years ago, and last June/July decided I'd never work again so consider me that dude in the shadows bitching about eveything.
 
Jim Venolia
Ranch Hand
Posts: 462
Chrome Linux VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Re-reading my post a thought hit me.  Could Javascript be as popular as it is because when, it encounters an error, it just silently returns the wrong result?  No error, no problem.  Finding wrong results in a "working" program is a lot harder than fixing an error message.

I effin hate Javascript with a passion, in case you haven't noticed yet.
 
Marshal
Posts: 62801
203
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Please go back to your posts and put quote tags around any text that has been quoted from that Slashdot thread, so we know how much is your own thoughts.
 
Jim Venolia
Ranch Hand
Posts: 462
Chrome Linux VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There are no slashdot quotes that I know of, I read the headline and posted.
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 62801
203
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I didn't notice that anybody on Slashdot produced any figures or evidence for that assertion. Maybe the figures on Tiobe will be different. Yes, the security scandals with Java6 were serious, but the language appears to have recovered.
And some of the people on that Slashdot thread disagreed with the assertion, so I think the language is still viable.
 
Jim Venolia
Ranch Hand
Posts: 462
Chrome Linux VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I was responding to the headline, namely How Dead is Java.  There were no replies on /. when I posted this.

I respect the hell out of you, but here I really have to ask Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 62801
203
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jim Venolia wrote:. . . Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?

In that case, don't say, “Subby's notes”.
 
Sheriff
Posts: 24074
54
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I remember hearing about ADA back in the Dark Ages, but I didn't know it was still being used. In fact I didn't know anybody ever used it. But I see from Wikipedia that I'm ignorant in that respect. Likewise those people on Slashdot seem to me to be ignorant and have no arguments except for cheap slogans.
 
Campbell Ritchie
Marshal
Posts: 62801
203
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well, now I have been to bed and got up, I am sorry for getting confused about the Subby's notes part.
 
author
Posts: 23812
140
C++ Chrome Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser Java jQuery Linux VI Editor Windows
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jim Venolia wrote:Re-reading my post a thought hit me.  Could Javascript be as popular as it is because when, it encounters an error, it just silently returns the wrong result?  No error, no problem.  Finding wrong results in a "working" program is a lot harder than fixing an error message.



Javascript is a weakly typed language -- in contrast to Java which is a strongly typed language.

Strongly typed languages seems to follow the 80/20 rule of development. I mean that it could take 80% of the work to get to prototype, and another 20% to get to production. Weakly typed languages seems to be the reverse. It could only take 20% of the work to get to prototype, and another 80% to get to production.

Startups tend to like weakly typed languages more -- as prototype means funding vs shutting down the company.

Henry
 
Master Rancher
Posts: 3887
45
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Paul Clapham wrote:I remember hearing about ADA back in the Dark Ages, but I didn't know it was still being used. In fact I didn't know anybody ever used it.



It was my first jobbing language.
And, as with the OP, it was a defence project.
Never touched it since, though.
 
I promise I will be the best, most loyal friend ever! All for this tiny ad:
Programmatically Create PDF Using Free Spire.PDF with Java
https://coderanch.com/wiki/703735/Programmatically-Create-PDF-Free-Spire
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!