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Java Web Start Question.  RSS feed

 
Ranch Hand
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I have learned it is possible to embed a Java Web Start program into a web browser
by means of a specal JNLP Tag.

-Does this only work because of a separate, installed plugin for Java Applet support,
or is the JNLP tag and in browser support come by default with the major web browsers?

-Will In Browser JNLP support continue into the future as Java applets are no longer
used and done, anymore?
 
Marshal
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Well, I'm not sure how it all works now. But I can tell you this: at the company where I used to work, we had an applet which customers used to upload their orders. As you know, applets are on their way out, so in discussions with my former co-worker who is still dealing with that issue, he told me that they were working on a JNLP version of the applet. It sounded like he was well on the way to making that work.

That what I know about the problem. Whether it's a special tag, I don't remember now. And how long JNLP will be supported in browsers, I also don't know. It's possible that JNLP is going to be unsupported at some point in the future.
 
Rancher
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The browser pluging isn't supported from jdk9+
You can stil use java webstart
What is Java Web Start and how is it launched?
The Java Web Start software allows you to download and run Java applications from the web. The Java Web Start software:

   Provides an easy, one-click activation of applications
   Guarantees that you are always running the latest version of the application
   Eliminates complicated installation or upgrade procedures

Getting Java Web Start Software

Java Web Start is included in the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) since release of Java 5.0. This means that when you install Java, you get Java Web Start installed automatically. The Java Web Start software is launched automatically, when a Java application using Java Web Start technology is downloaded for the first time. The Java Web Start software caches (stores) the entire application locally on your computer. Thus, any subsequent launches are almost instantaneous as all the required resources are already available locally. Every time you start the application, the Java Web Start software component checks the application's website to see if a new version is available, and if so, automatically downloads and launches it.
Launching an Application Using Java Web Start Software
From a browser

Click on a link from a web page.
From desktop icon

If you use an application frequently, you can create a shortcut on your desktop or in the Start Menu. Java Web Start may ask if you would like to create shortcuts or an entry in the Start Menu. If you reply Yes, all future launches of the application can start without a browser.
From Java Application Cache Viewer

Java Web Start also provides an Application Cache Viewer which you can launch from the Java Control Panel. The Cache viewer enables you to directly launch applications that you have downloaded.
Instructions to launch from Application Cache Viewer

   Go to Start > Settings > Control Panel > Double click on the Java icon. The Java Control Panel will start.
   Click on the General tab
   Click on the View button from the Temporary Internet Files section
   Double click on the respective application from the list that you want to launch

From command prompt

You can also launch an application from a command prompt by typing javaws jnlp_url where jnlp_url is a url to the jnlp file of the application.

   Go to Start > Run > type command
   A command prompt window will appear.
   Type javaws url_of_jnlp


 
Bartender
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JNLP and applets are 2 different things.

An applet is basically an application running inside the browser. It has quite a few limitations. Originally, it was expected to be one of the major uses for Java, but back then, JVMs were too large to download just to run applets and Microsoft got snitty because their attempts to hijack Java were thwarted, so Windows never shipped with a JVM pre-installed.

Later, when disk storage and network speeds routinely became large enough to make downloading a JVM just to run an application practical, it developed that the supposed "sandbox" security for applets was seriously deficient, and applets have since become deprecated. Ironically, JavaScript has mostly taken its place.

JNLP, on the other hand, downloads - and caches - full stand-alone applications. Once downloaded, you no longer need a browser, or even an Internet connection to run them.
 
Zachary Mitchell
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-Is it possible to embed a Java WebStart / JNLP inside
the body of a web page, in a similar physical kind of fashion
as with a (former) Java applet?
 
Tim Holloway
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Peter Baumarchais wrote:-Is it possible to embed a Java WebStart / JNLP inside
the body of a web page, in a similar physical kind of fashion
as with a (former) Java applet?



Alas, no. It runs as a stand-alone application, and if it needs a window, it opens one on the desktop.

Actually, there was a patent on running applications in browser windows, but it was really only ever enforced as revenge on Microsoft (cost them a half-billion dollars to settle).

These days, you can do almost anything you'd do in an applet using JavaScript and AJAX, although applications are still going to be more performant and less restricted.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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