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Is Oracle java 8 latest update (8u202) free to use for commercial/enterprise purpose?  RSS feed

 
Greenhorn
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Oracle has ended its support for java 8, but is it available for use as commercial purpose? The Oracle Binary Code License (https://jdk.java.net/java-se-ri/bcl) is free for enterprise purpose?
Is java 8 JRE which is publicly released by Oracle on their website free for commercial use?
 
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Welcome to the Ranch

Please see this thread.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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I merged your stuff with the following thread. I hope that is okay by you.
 
dj raman
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In my company, we use features of java such as Applets.
1. Is Oracle Java SE 8 8u202 (latest) free to be used commercially if client does not use any commercial feature?
2. Does the bundling of client side java (JRE) of latest Java 8 include/bundle commercial features of Oracle Java SE as well?
3. How to identify if JRE given by Oracle includes any commercial features or not?
 
Campbell Ritchie
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dj raman wrote:. . . we use features of java such as Applets. . . .

Why? Nobody else uses applets any more.

I think this question would fit better as a continuation of your previous question, so I shall merge the two. When you read the license agreement, what did it say about commercial use?
 
dj raman
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After a bit of research and going through lots of documentation provided by Oracle, I have summarized following:
1. Oracle has stopped public updates of Java 8 after January 2019 for commercial use.
2. The latest Java available right now for download is update provided by Oracle before the January 2019 and hence its still available for commercial use (Under some restrictions)
3. The Commercial use of Oracle Java SE 8 (8u202) JRE is licensed to be used commercially if it fits under the criteria of not using Commercial Features
4. The Non-Commercial features mentioned under the BCL license are: JRE, JDK, JavaFx (Everything we require for commercial use).

So can I conclude that I can use the Latest java for commercially free of cost?

Please can someone verify if my analysis is correct?
 
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From the Oracle Java FAQ:

Is Java still free?
The current version of Java - Java SE 11 is available from Oracle under an open source license at http://jdk.java.net/11/. Java SE 8 remains free of charge for general purpose desktop and server use and is available under the Oracle Binary Code License (BCL) at https://www.oracle.com/javadownload.



You can also get the open source version of Java:

http://openjdk.java.net/

So the two things to notice are licensing and support.  If you want an open source license and you don't mind community support, get OpenJDK.  If you want professional support and you don't mind the Oracle license, use Oracle.  

But there is one big caveat to the Oracle license and that is audits.  If you use Oracle support, Oracle can audit you to make sure all of your Java is Oracle.  If someone downloads and uses an open source version you can be fined.  

So for me, I'm going with OpenJDK 11, and Oracle JDK 8 -- but I'm not a company.  Your mileage may vary.
 
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I'm with Knute. Oracle's license enforcement comes straight out of Mordor.

Re-think those applets, though. Apparently Java 8 is one of the last versions of Java that contain Applet support - or at least the appletviewer.
 
dj raman
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Thanks for the info. And I agree with Knute for the suggestion on OpenJDK.

Knute Snortum wrote:From the Oracle Java FAQ:

Is Java still free?
The current version of Java - Java SE 11 is available from Oracle under an open source license at http://jdk.java.net/11/. Java SE 8 remains free of charge for general purpose desktop and server use and is available under the Oracle Binary Code License (BCL) at https://www.oracle.com/javadownload.



You can also get the open source version of Java:

http://openjdk.java.net/



But There seems to be an issue with OpenJDK 8 as well!!! https://coderanch.com/t/706508/java/happened-download-URLs-OpenJDK

There are many alternatives for Oracle Java that are building there binaries with OpenJDK build (AdoptOpenJDK, Redhat, IBM, Azul etc.)
But I would want to stick to OpenJDK pure build provided by Oracle on OpenJDK website. But it seems that is also not available since they have removed it from website.
 
Tim Holloway
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That's one of the advantages of open-source over proprietary software. Very rarely does old open-source software disappear completely from the Internet. It may get moved out of the main archives, but you can generally still find it.

A proprietary vendor feels no such obligation. In fact, a proprietary vendor may deliberately remove their product from the Internet. For one thing, that eliminates the possibility that someone would attempt to use what they considered a "dead" product and hold them legally liable for unexpected results.

It doesn't matter if it's Oracle or IBM, Microsoft or Apple. Not all of the price of proprietary software is in dollars, rupees, or yen.
 
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