Win a copy of Programmers Guide to Apache Thrift this week in the Open Source forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Knute Snortum
  • Paul Clapham
  • Tim Cooke
Sheriffs:
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Bear Bibeault
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Ron McLeod
  • Piet Souris
  • Frits Walraven
Bartenders:
  • Ganesh Patekar
  • Tim Holloway
  • salvin francis

Why has Python seen such a high adoption rate within introductory CS classes at universities?  RSS feed

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some of the explanation for Python's growth at the college level (e.g., ease of use) can be applied to other languages as well as Python.
So why has Python seen such a high adoption rate within introductory CS classes at universities?
It seems to me this is important since the choice of what programming language is first learned may influence a students' first impression of the field of computer science.
 
Marshal
Posts: 64471
225
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Remember it isn't students who decide the languages taught. Maybe Python is perceived as easier to learn than other languages.
 
author
Posts: 15
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anecdotally, students like Python classes better because they can get more done faster (fewer lines of code, easier to use libraries, more friendly ecosystem) than in the other popular teaching languages—Java & C++. And since they're more engaged and excited it helps with retention, so of course faculty is in favor of it too. Another benefit of Python as a teaching language is that it has a pretty strong resemblance to what most pseudocode typically looks like.

So, I don't think there's just one reason, but the reasons I can think of are:
- succinct, easy to read syntax
- welcoming community
- strong library ecosystem
- excellent cross-platform story
- limited boilerplate to get started

Many languages check some of these boxes, but few check all of them. Also, being used widely in machine learning/data science has made Python popular in academia as well.
 
Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!