• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Paul Clapham
Sheriffs:
  • Tim Cooke
  • Knute Snortum
  • Bear Bibeault
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Piet Souris
  • Ganesh Patekar
Bartenders:
  • Frits Walraven
  • Carey Brown
  • Tim Holloway

New to Java....need help!

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

So...first off I am not a programmer per-se.  Call me the Code-Dabbler.  I try to learn as I go.

Anyway, I have been interested in streaming live video for a couple years now.   Currently I am playing
around with an evaluation copy of a Webrtc media server called antmedia.  What I was trying to do is
sounded fairly simple in the beginning.  I want to create a random value and store it out to a mysql database.
Creating the random value was not an issue.  However storing it is.
I tried using Ajax, but for some strange reason, it would not work on the server.  So....

Since the server is Apache Tomcat and I have no experience with it, I did some digging and
found many examples of performing database queries using a "servlet".  Here is the example that caught my
eye:  http://www.tutorialspoint.com/jdbc/jdbc-sample-code.htm

After a few hours of scratching my head, cursing and ready to give up, I actually got it to work!  I ran into an
error about the being deprecated and to use


I also ran into a warning about the "Time" source or some such thing so I did this:


Well, there were a couple other things I had to do to finally get it to work (Woo-Hoo!!!), unfortunately I forgot the additional things I did to make it work, which leads me to my predicament.
Going against my normal procedures, I did not document anything I did!

And even worse, all of the coding/fixing I did in the /tmp directory.  And yea, without thinking, I rebooted the server and lost it all! Dummy me!

So I'm basically back, not to square one, but maybe square 3?

Note that I am working this servlet in a stand alone mode.  No IDE.

Since the example at http://www.tutorialspoint.com/jdbc/jdbc-sample-code.htm doesn't say much about the class or classpath, maybe that's where I might
be having the problem?

So after I compile the .java file, and run it, I am getting this error:

root@RaysServer:~/Java# java FirstExample
java.lang.ClassNotFoundException: com.mysql.cj.jdbc.Driver
       at java.base/jdk.internal.loader.BuiltinClassLoader.loadClass(BuiltinClassLoader.java:583)
       at java.base/jdk.internal.loader.ClassLoaders$AppClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoaders.java:178)
       at java.base/java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:521)
       at java.base/java.lang.Class.forName0(Native Method)
       at java.base/java.lang.Class.forName(Class.java:315)
       at FirstExample.main(FirstExample.java:19)
Goodbye!

I am using:
root@RaysServer:~/Java# java -version
openjdk version "11.0.3" 2019-04-16
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 11.0.3+7-Ubuntu-1ubuntu218.04.1)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 11.0.3+7-Ubuntu-1ubuntu218.04.1, mixed mode, sharing)

Here is my environment at /root/Java/

-rw-r--r-- 1 root root    2776 Jun 27 08:42 FirstExample.class
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root    2219 Jun 27 08:29 FirstExample.java
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    4096 Jun 26 20:09 lib
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root    4096 Jun 26 19:54 META-INF
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 2293132 Mar 20 15:39 mysql-connector-java-8.0.16.jar
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root    4096 Jun 27 08:40 WEB-INF

lib --> mysql-connector-java-8.0.16.jar
META-INF --> MANIFEST.MF --> Class-Path: mysql-connector-java-8.0.16.jar
WEB-INF --> lib --> mysql-connector-java-8.0.16.jar

I am not sure about any of these.  I just kept adding them as looked at other examples.

Eventually I want to modify this servlet and then integrate this into the existing Apache-Tomcat app.
But for now I just want it to work in standalone mode.

So here is my database:

mysql> select * from Employees;
+-----+-----+--------+--------+
| id  | age | first  | last   |
+-----+-----+--------+--------+
| 100 |  18 | Zara   | Ali    |
| 101 |  25 | Mahnaz | Fatma  |
| 102 |  30 | Zaid   | Khan   |
| 103 |  28 | Sumit  | Mittal |
+-----+-----+--------+--------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Here is the servlet with my changes:

//STEP 1. Import required packages
import java.sql.*;

public class FirstExample {
  // JDBC driver name and database URL
  static final String JDBC_DRIVER = "com.mysql.cj.jdbc.Driver";
  static final String DB_URL = "jdbc:mysql://localhost/TEST?useUnicode=true&useJDBCCompliantTimezoneShift=true&useLegacyDatetimeCode=false&serverTimezone=UTC";

  //  Database credentials
  static final String USER = "root";
  static final String PASS = "password";

  public static void main(String[] args) {
  Connection conn = null;
  Statement stmt = null;
  try{
     //STEP 2: Register JDBC driver
     Class.forName("com.mysql.cj.jdbc.Driver");

     //STEP 3: Open a connection
     System.out.println("Connecting to database...");
     conn = DriverManager.getConnection(DB_URL,USER,PASS);

     //STEP 4: Execute a query
     System.out.println("Creating statement...");
     stmt = conn.createStatement();
     String sql;
     sql = "SELECT id, first, last, age FROM Employees";
     ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery(sql);

     //STEP 5: Extract data from result set
     while(rs.next()){
        //Retrieve by column name
        int id  = rs.getInt("id");
        int age = rs.getInt("age");
        String first = rs.getString("first");
        String last = rs.getString("last");

        //Display values
        System.out.print("ID: " + id);
        System.out.print(", Age: " + age);
        System.out.print(", First: " + first);
        System.out.println(", Last: " + last);
     }
     //STEP 6: Clean-up environment
     rs.close();
     stmt.close();
     conn.close();
  }catch(SQLException se){
     //Handle errors for JDBC
     se.printStackTrace();
  }catch(Exception e){
     //Handle errors for Class.forName
     e.printStackTrace();
}finally{
     //finally block used to close resources
     try{
        if(stmt!=null)
           stmt.close();
     }catch(SQLException se2){
     }// nothing we can do
     try{
        if(conn!=null)
           conn.close();
     }catch(SQLException se){
        se.printStackTrace();
     }//end finally try
  }//end try
  System.out.println("Goodbye!");
}//end main
}//end FirstExample

As I said, this worked beautifully...if only I can remember what I did to make it work!!

The best thing to do is for someone to try this in stand alone and tell me what I am missing....if you have the time
and compassion to help and old guy out!  

If there is any other information you need, let me know.

Your Help would be highly appreciated!!




 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 125
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How are you compiling the program? You need to pass -cp argument with the mysql jar file location. So, it should be
javac -cp /root/java/mysql-connector*.jar your-program.java
And then:
java -cp /root/java/mysql-connector*.jar your-program.java
to execute it.
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Salil Wadnerkar wrote:How are you compiling the program? You need to pass -cp argument with the mysql jar file location. So, it should be
javac -cp /root/java/mysql-connector*.jar your-program.java
And then:
java -cp /root/java/mysql-connector*.jar your-program.java
to execute it.



Wow!   That worked!  Thanks!

Another question...how would I actually run a servlet from within a web page?

Ray
 
Salil Wadnerkar
Ranch Hand
Posts: 125
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Your web page is the code browser executes. So, that is javascript code in the HTML page your server sends to the browser, upon browser request.
Your servlet is the code executed by your server so that it can send a HTML page (+ javascript) to the browser.
In Java, you can use a servlet container like Tomcat to execute servlets. You can just google for any introductory article about writing servlets and executing it on Tomcat.
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Salil Wadnerkar wrote:Your web page is the code browser executes. So, that is javascript code in the HTML page your server sends to the browser, upon browser request.
Your servlet is the code executed by your server so that it can send a HTML page (+ javascript) to the browser.
In Java, you can use a servlet container like Tomcat to execute servlets. You can just google for any introductory article about writing servlets and executing it on Tomcat.



So actually I don't want my servlet to send html.  I only need to save a variable to the database.  And anothe servlet to read it out of the database.
So the index.html will save a variable to the database via the servlet.  And another page, player.html, will read the same location via another servlet.

I think...

Ray
 
Salil Wadnerkar
Ranch Hand
Posts: 125
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Browser sending you the data, and the servlet saving it can be done via POST request.
Typically, index.html is the first page people see, and I am assuming you want to provide both GET and POST for this page.
Your player.html handling servlet should handle the GET request by reading from database, and creating a response (typically via JSP).
 
Marshal
Posts: 24594
55
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ray Jender wrote:So actually I don't want my servlet to send html.  I only need to save a variable to the database.



That's fine. But a servlet does have to send a response. You could just send HTTP response code 200 (which means "OK") but if a person sent the request from a browser then you might want to tell the person about whether your database insert worked or not.
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

So I have the stand alone servlet to get the data out of the DB.   Updating the DB is a little more challenging.

Ray
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ray Jender wrote:
So I have the stand alone servlet to get the data out of the DB.   Updating the DB is a little more challenging.

Ray



Ok I think I have 2 servlets working.  One to update the database and one to read the database.

Now need to figure out how to integrate them into the existing java development.
 
Paul Clapham
Marshal
Posts: 24594
55
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ray Jender wrote:Now need to figure out how to integrate them into the existing java development.



This existing Java development... is there a reason why it has to use servlets to update a database? Wouldn't it be a whole lot easier to just update the database directly from the existing Java code?
 
Paul Clapham
Marshal
Posts: 24594
55
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Paul Clapham wrote:Wouldn't it be a whole lot easier to just update the database directly from the existing Java code?



Sorry. I was sloppy and didn't read the code you posted. When I went back and looked, I was surprised that, despite what you said, your code isn't a servlet.

It's just plain old Java code. Which is just as well. You really don't need the hassle of setting up a web server just so you can update a database.
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Paul Clapham wrote:

Paul Clapham wrote:Wouldn't it be a whole lot easier to just update the database directly from the existing Java code?



Sorry. I was sloppy and didn't read the code you posted. When I went back and looked, I was surprised that, despite what you said, your code isn't a servlet.

It's just plain old Java code. Which is just as well. You really don't need the hassle of setting up a web server just so you can update a database.



Maybe I did not articulate my issue very well.   I have an existing Apache Tomcat based application that I am modifying slightly.  In order to do the mod,
I create a random 12 digit number using javascript in the index.html file  and need to store it in a mysql database. That's were AJAX comes in.
Subsequently, a user will need to retrieve it from the DB.    The apache tomcat server does not support PHP so I figured java servlets would do the trick?
Confused as to why you say my code is not a servlet?   All examples I have found use the similar method to access the DB?

Remember I am totally new to this.
 
Paul Clapham
Marshal
Posts: 24594
55
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ray Jender wrote:Maybe I did not articulate my issue very well.   I have an existing Apache Tomcat based application that I am modifying slightly.  In order to do the mod,
I create a random 12 digit number using javascript in the index.html file  and need to store it in a mysql database. That's were AJAX comes in.
Subsequently, a user will need to retrieve it from the DB.    The apache tomcat server does not support PHP so I figured java servlets would do the trick?



Okay. For now I will assume the idea of generating the 12-digit number on the client side is okay. Then you have to have some way of sending it to the server side, where Tomcat runs. Your AJAX code would take care of that by sending a request to this servlet you're planning to write.

Can I also assume that your Tomcat application is already using that database? If so then looking at existing servlets which use the database would be helpful.

Confused as to why you say my code is not a servlet?   All examples I have found use the similar method to access the DB?



Your code doesn't even extend HttpServlet. It's true that if you're going to include code in your Tomcat-based application that you're going to have to use servlets, but if you're looking for examples of how to update a database then don't expect those examples to be examples of servlets.
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Paul Clapham wrote:

Ray Jender wrote:Maybe I did not articulate my issue very well.   I have an existing Apache Tomcat based application that I am modifying slightly.  In order to do the mod,
I create a random 12 digit number using javascript in the index.html file  and need to store it in a mysql database. That's were AJAX comes in.
Subsequently, a user will need to retrieve it from the DB.    The apache tomcat server does not support PHP so I figured java servlets would do the trick?



Okay. For now I will assume the idea of generating the 12-digit number on the client side is okay. Then you have to have some way of sending it to the server side, where Tomcat runs. Your AJAX code would take care of that by sending a request to this servlet you're planning to write.

Can I also assume that your Tomcat application is already using that database? If so then looking at existing servlets which use the database would be helpful.

Confused as to why you say my code is not a servlet?   All examples I have found use the similar method to access the DB?



Your code doesn't even extend HttpServlet. It's true that if you're going to include code in your Tomcat-based application that you're going to have to use servlets, but if you're looking for examples of how to update a database then don't expect those examples to be examples of servlets.



No.  The tomcat is not using any database.

I need only to save one variable in the server so subsequent clients can access it so I thought the database would be the way to go.  In the future I will add more to the db,  but for now I only need to prove I can save and retrieve the variable.
Perhaps there is an easier way?  The apache-tomcat server does not support php, that's why I am trying java.

I can manually run two different java's, one to save and one to read from the db, but I'm stuck how to run them from the index.html page?




 
Paul Clapham
Marshal
Posts: 24594
55
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ray Jender wrote:No.  The tomcat is not using any database.

I need only to save one variable in the server so subsequent clients can access it so I thought the database would be the way to go.  In the future I will add more to the db,  but for now I only need to prove I can save and retrieve the variable.
Perhaps there is an easier way?  The apache-tomcat server does not support php, that's why I am trying java.

I can manually run two different java's, one to save and one to read from the db, but I'm stuck how to run them from the index.html page?



Oh dear.

Let's summarize a bit. You want to create a small piece of information, and you want to store it in some place where the web app can retrieve it and allow clients to use it. (Or perhaps, it's the browser which needs to retrieve it from the web app?)

And the web app isn't using a database.

I think I would first look for solutions other than databases. That's because you'd have to set up the database on the server and configure Tomcat to know where the database is, configure the server to run the database, and so on. A lot of work for one piece of information. Plus extra work for the managers of the web app. (Hopefully managers do exist. I sort of get the feeling that this web app is legacy software and there's nobody in charge of it.)

You could store the small piece of information in application scope in the web app, but then it would disappear whenever the web app had to be restarted and you'd have to set it up again. Probably that's going to be too inconvenient.

Or you could store it in a file on the server where Tomcat is running. You'd just need a folder on that machine to which Tomcat's user profile has access, then you could create a file for it. That's the approach that I would consider first.

Of course all of this depends on your ability to add new servlets to the existing Tomcat web app. To do that you're going to need access to its source code and you're going to need authority to create and update the web app.

I'm assuming that the random 12-digit number is related in some way to the existing web app, too. Another possibility would be to create a different web app (which would also run in Tomcat) just to keep track of this number. Assuming there's only one instance of the number, that is.
 
Paul Clapham
Marshal
Posts: 24594
55
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ray Jender wrote:Currently I am playing around with an evaluation copy of a Webrtc media server called antmedia.



So I guess this means that you don't have access to the web app and can't make changes to it?

Is this random value supposed to affect how the web app works?
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Paul Clapham wrote:

Ray Jender wrote:Currently I am playing around with an evaluation copy of a Webrtc media server called antmedia.



So I guess this means that you don't have access to the web app and can't make changes to it?

Is this random value supposed to affect how the web app works?



So I'll define the "broadcaster" as the owner of the app and the live video streamer.
The viewer is anyone who wants to view the broadcast.

I do have access to the source code for the app.  And currently, the broadcaster  has to either accept a default value for the streamID  that he is presented with,
or select his own value.  Then click a "Start Broadcasting" button.  Then, the broadcaster has to manually send this value to whoever wants to view the video broadcast.  

What I am doing is trying to make this process more automatic. So the app user gets the random value and saves it to the database.  Subsequently the viewer browses to another page,
which accesses the database and retrieves the same random value for the streamID and begins viewing the live stream.

I can get as far as generating the random value and assigning it to the broadcaster streamID,  but am stuck at saving it out to the database and on the other side, a viewer
retrieving it to view the broadcast.  Initially I thought an AJAX call to a php would do it, but the app Apache-Tomcat does not support php.

Here is a little more detail:

* Ubuntu 18.04.1 Server.
* Tomcat Version : Apache Tomcat/8.5.38
* Servlet Specification Version : 3.1
* JSP version : 2.3

java -version
openjdk version "11.0.3" 2019-04-16
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 11.0.3+7-Ubuntu-1ubuntu218.04.1)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 11.0.3+7-Ubuntu-1ubuntu218.04.1, mixed mode, sharing)

mysql> select version();
+-------------------------+
| version()               |
+-------------------------+
| 5.7.26-0ubuntu0.18.04.1 |
+-------------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

So I am playing with an evaluation copy of an Apache-Tomcat server application.

I have installed it on Ubuntu 18.04 and it works as advertised.  Great!

Now I am trying to add a process to get a javascript variable and update a mysql database with it. I need to save a single javascript variable in a database.  This is because a subsequent client needs to be able to read it out of the database.
 
So the app came with an index.html file. The top of the index.html file has the following line:

<%@ page language="java" contentType="text/html; charset=UTF-8" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>

I have created the database WebRTCApp:

mysql> use WebRTCApp;
mysql> select * from broadcast;
+----+----------+
| id | streamID |
+----+----------+
|  1 | 7xh30n4xp08 |
+----+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

I am creating a random 11 character variable with javascript that I will use to define the streamID.

So, I thought I could accomplish what I need to do using Ajax and PHP, but the Apache-Tomcat server does not support using PHP.  I guess that leaves me with Java Servlets?
 
I've looked at many examples of java servlet usage but the more I look, the more confused I get.

Can anyone advise on how I can achieve, what appears to be simple task? If you need additional information on this mysterious app, let me know.

However, the issue is strictly how apache-tomcat can store a javascript variable  to mysql.  And subsequently, a client retrieves the variable from the same database.

PS: I am not a programmer or coder per-se, more of a "learn-as-I-go" dabbler,  so show this old man a little compassion!  

Thanks,

Ray

 
Salil Wadnerkar
Ranch Hand
Posts: 125
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I suggest that since you are not familiar with how java servlets work, you can forget about this task for now, and just get "hello world" servlet working. This will introduce you to servlet mapping, and writing simple servlet that handles GET request from browser. Then you can develop a simple program where you submit your name via POST request, and the server responds back with "Hello, <your name>". Once you have these basic pieces working, you can easily finish your task.
 
Paul Clapham
Marshal
Posts: 24594
55
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If I understand it right, you have to create this random string exactly once, and then you can start broadcasting.

If that's the case then I would suggest this simpler process:

1. Create the random string.

2. Write it on a piece of paper.

3. Find the place in the application's source code where the user will be looking for the random string.

4. Modify that by hard-coding the random string there.

Right now you're setting yourself up for several learning curves. I'm suggesting you look for opportunities not to go up those curves. There's a recent buzz phrase in programming: Do the simplest thing that can possibly work.
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Paul Clapham wrote:If I understand it right, you have to create this random string exactly once, and then you can start broadcasting.

If that's the case then I would suggest this simpler process:

1. Create the random string.

2. Write it on a piece of paper.

3. Find the place in the application's source code where the user will be looking for the random string.

4. Modify that by hard-coding the random string there.

Right now you're setting yourself up for several learning curves. I'm suggesting you look for opportunities not to go up those curves. There's a recent buzz phrase in programming: Do the simplest thing that can possibly work.



Your suggestion goes totally opposite of what I am trying to accomplish.  I don't mind several learning curves.  I just need to learn what I need to do, not program a space launch.....

 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Salil Wadnerkar wrote:I suggest that since you are not familiar with how java servlets work, you can forget about this task for now, and just get "hello world" servlet working. This will introduce you to servlet mapping, and writing simple servlet that handles GET request from browser. Then you can develop a simple program where you submit your name via POST request, and the server responds back with "Hello, <your name>". Once you have these basic pieces working, you can easily finish your task.



Where can I find this "Hello World" servlet?
 
Salil Wadnerkar
Ranch Hand
Posts: 125
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some tutorials:
I suggest you use IDE like Netbeans first:
https://www.studytonight.com/servlet/creating-servlet-in-netbeans.php
If you don't like IDEs, and like command-line:
https://www.ntu.edu.sg/home/ehchua/programming/java/JavaServlets.html
 
Paul Clapham
Marshal
Posts: 24594
55
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ray Jender wrote:Your suggestion goes totally opposite of what I am trying to accomplish.  I don't mind several learning curves.  I just need to learn what I need to do, not program a space launch.....



Oh, sorry. Your original post said you were interested in streaming live video. My mistake was assuming that was your goal. Sorry about that.
 
Ray Jender
Greenhorn
Posts: 21
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Paul Clapham wrote:

Ray Jender wrote:Your suggestion goes totally opposite of what I am trying to accomplish.  I don't mind several learning curves.  I just need to learn what I need to do, not program a space launch.....



Oh, sorry. Your original post said you were interested in streaming live video. My mistake was assuming that was your goal. Sorry about that.



I can stream live video already.  I just want to modify how it's being done. I am trying the simple HelloServlet example at https://www.ntu.edu.sg/home/ehchua/programming/java/JavaServlets.html as suggested.

Having problems getting it to run.   Seems that the app I'm running  does not quite follow what I am reading in the various examples and tutorials.  For instance, it is not using port 8080, as some examples call for.
And the file directory structure us not the same as the examples or tutorials.   I'lll keep digging at it until I can no longer take the frustration and then call for help!

Thanks for your help.

Ray
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!