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Java Database Connections & Transactions

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 45
Android Spring Java
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A very warm welcome Marco! Glad to see new JDBC books coming up that emphasizes the importance of basics.

I had a couple of questions:
  • Does this book dwell into best practices, especially around writing scalable applications that can work on heavy loads?
  • Given that sometimes framework's (eg. Hibernate) own approach becomes a bottleneck in applications demanding high performance, are they are recommendations around having pure framework based applications or a mixed approach?

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    Hi Dinkar,
    thanks for your questions.

    1. Nope, it does not, explicitly. The question however is: "what is an application with heavy loads". Hundreds of transactions a day, like in the other thread, is really nothing. 100 transactions a second, continously 24x7 would be a different story. I do think however it's an important question, let me continue answering it with the second question of yours.

    2. I don't really think that Hibernate has its own approach. What I think happens is that developers with little knowledge of SQL AND Hibernate think they can simply use Hibernate , never care about DB queries again and then suddenly they find themselves with business workflows like a user registration, that spawns 400 sql queries (a true real-life example I encountered recently!), whereas the whole workflow should probably have < 7 statements executed. There's also a ton of other factors at play here, but then this answer would get bigger and bigger

    I think this is a huge topic, sadly not covered anywhere in sufficient detail. Not in the scope of my book, but maybe in the next one
     
    Dinkar Chaturvedi
    Ranch Hand
    Posts: 45
    Android Spring Java
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    Thanks Marco for your response!

    I completely agree with your statement about this being a big topic and I certainly hope one of your next book covers this. Looking forward!

    Regards
    Dinkar
     
    It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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