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Problem with code, 'else' without 'if'

 
Greenhorn
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Hi! I have a problem with my code.
Can anyone help me?

Code:


Here is the code:

PLEASE HELP!
 
Master Rancher
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Sheriff
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Welcome to the Ranch!

As Mike has shown, you have to watch for those stray semi-colons. You don't want them breaking up your if-else statements.
 
Bartender
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This typically means you have a semi-colon (;) after the if(), like:
The semi-colon by itself tells the compiler that you want an empty statement, which in most cases, you don't, especial with a following 'else'.
 
Lipt Codder
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Mike Simmons wrote:




Thank You!!
 
Lipt Codder
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Carey Brown wrote:This typically means you have a semi-colon (;) after the if(), like:
The semi-colon by itself tells the compiler that you want an empty statement, which in most cases, you don't, especial with a following 'else'.



Thanks for help, too. :3
 
Lipt Codder
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Junilu Lacar wrote:Welcome to the Ranch!

As Mike has shown, you have to watch for those stray semi-colons. You don't want them breaking up your if-else statements.



 
Greenhorn
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Try using this way::

 
Marshal
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Sherin Mathew wrote:Try using this way . . .

Once you have so many if‑elses, you might be better off with a different construct. Try...or...
 
Marshal
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Lipt Codder wrote:if (number1 == 1)
           out.println("Z0NK!");
       else if (number1 == 2) ;
       out.println("Z0NK2!");
       else if (number1 == 3)
           out.println("Z0NK3!");


If you were disciplined adding curly braces, such error less likely would have happened.

Demonstrating:

That just explains how cutting corners and trying to save few keystrokes and few lines of code leads you to the bugs you faced and hence spent way more time to solve the problem (assuming that's happened) than you really could have spent if were more pedantic and disciplined.

Don't import java.lang.System.*, just use System.out.print() as it is a more conventional way. Probably more developers than not got used to such construct.

Pay attention to indentation. Your line 24 is off. Poor indentation also leads to bugs. If that's taking too much time for you, use automated tools to format your code. Research on search engines how that can be done. You also have some excessive amount of empty lines near the end of source code - that also contributes to a messiness.

Why you call variables j and t? What do they represent? Name them so they tell you something. Variables as i, j, k usually are used for counter purposes within the loops (and in particular nested ones, which also are a poor practice, so better extract them to methods).
 
Sheriff
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Liutauras Vilda wrote:Pay attention to indentation. Your line 24 is off. Poor indentation also leads to bugs. If that's taking too much time for you, use automated tools to format your code. Research on search engines how that can be done.


You could also look at HowToFormatCode (that's a link).
 
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