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Reading advice

 
Ranch Hand
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Hi, I was thinking about refreshing my knowledge of Java from basic concepts to advanced stuff.
I am considenring Core Java by Cay Horstmann I & II or reading tutorials from site: journaldev.com
I remember that I read about how Strings work in Java (Srting Pool etc) and it was well explained.
Anyone had experience with both? What would you recommend? I've seen posts around here from author of the book, maybe he could share his point of view too.
 
author & internet detective
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I'd recommend Cay's book. A book can go into more detail than online tutorials
 
Greenhorn
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I recommend Head First Java by Kathy Sierra & Bert Bates, to  refresh your beginner Java. For learning advanced Java the book: Effective Java by Joshua Bloch.
 
Greenhorn
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Head First Java от Kathy Sierra & Bert Bates,  this is what you need. I also used this.

 
Marshal
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LA: welcome to the Ranch Agree that HFJ is a good book; if I were refreshing my knowledge however, I would probably go for Horstmann.
 
Greenhorn
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Hello everyone. I am new to this forum and to the programming. Thanks for your recommendations.
 
Ranch Hand
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I found the Murach series good too, and these might be more up to date https://www.murach.com/shop/murach-s-java-programming-5th-edition-detail .

The HF series is supremely good, but given it hasn't been updated for a decade or so, (as far as I can see), it's missing things like Servlet 3.0 stuff. I haven't programmed for ~5 years and returning to it now. HF series is still the best, but I'm finding it has some gaps.
 
Ranch Hand
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I agree with some of the posters on which books are generally considered "good" - Head First Java, Latest Java books by Cay Horstmann and Murach's Java. You can also try Deitel's Java book. I think there are video lectures also for that book on o'reilly books online which is a big plus.

Once you have figured out which book to use as your main resource, consider this course as a supplement. It teaches basics and also advanced concepts like JVM internals which I am sure most of the books don't teach.
https://www.udemy.com/course/java-in-depth-become-a-complete-java-engineer/

If you already know some Java and want a book for refreshing that knowledge quickly, then consider the "impatient" series by Cay Horstmann - https://www.amazon.com/Core-Java-SE-9-Impatient/dp/0134694724

Good luck !
 
Tom Joe
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:I'd recommend Cay's book. A book can go into more detail than online tutorials



Jeanne, what do you think about this course, especially the JVM internals section ?

https://www.udemy.com/course/java-in-depth-become-a-complete-java-engineer/

I'd appreciate it if you could please give some feedback. Thank you.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Why do you need to know about JVM internals? They are not usually relevant to your programming, and they can change without affecting your practice.
 
Tom Joe
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:Why do you need to know about JVM internals? They are not usually relevant to your programming, and they can change without affecting your practice.



I don't know if they will be useful to the average programmer, but they are there covered in the udemy course if someone is interested. Could you please see the list of contents under "JVM internals" in the udemy link and let us know how useful it could be ?
 
Tom Joe
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marten koomen wrote:I found the Murach series good too, and these might be more up to date https://www.murach.com/shop/murach-s-java-programming-5th-edition-detail .

The HF series is supremely good, but given it hasn't been updated for a decade or so, (as far as I can see), it's missing things like Servlet 3.0 stuff. I haven't programmed for ~5 years and returning to it now. HF series is still the best, but I'm finding it has some gaps.



I doubt that servlets are needed to learn basic Java. Aren't servlets becoming obsolete ?
 
Marshal
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Tom Joe wrote:I doubt that servlets are needed to learn basic Java. Aren't servlets becoming obsolete ?



It's true, servlets aren't needed to learn basic Java. But no, they aren't becoming obsolete and so you'd want a series of books which cover Java to include them properly.
 
Greenhorn
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Java is a versatile and powerful programming language and is very efficient for everyone who wants to write production code. This is a very popular programming language used for mobile applications, web applications, desktop applications, games, database connections, and much much more.

I know there are many varieties of Java books available in the market for one to learn Java for both beginners and advanced learners. But the most popular one or the one that has the largest number of users in my country is OCA
for beginners and advanced learners by a noted Jeanne Boyarsky, Scott Selikoff. We all believe it is the widest used textbook in the world for this purpose.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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RRF, welcome to the Ranch
 
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