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Algorithms specific to Quantum computing

 
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Does your book go into what and why there are algorithms exclusive to Quantum computing?  Does it have information on if it is the speed of quantum computing, the nature of it, or other reasons that the algorithms are targeted at the platform.  Also, it seems more and more that algorithms aren't taught, but people are introduced to libraries where the low level algorithms are presented.  What are the languages and platforms that are leading the way when it comes to Quantum computing?  Looking forward to learning more!

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David Sachdev
 
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David Sachdev wrote:Does your book go into what and why there are algorithms exclusive to Quantum computing?  Does it have information on if it is the speed of quantum computing, the nature of it, or other reasons that the algorithms are targeted at the platform.  Also, it seems more and more that algorithms aren't taught, but people are introduced to libraries where the low level algorithms are presented.



Hi David, thanks for these questions! Based on these, I think you'll really like the structure of our book. We dive straight into the quantum-specific algorithms such as QFT, Grover, Phase estimation, etc. We present them as library functions, and then go into detail about specifically what they're made of, why they work, and what aspects of a QPU (quantum processing unit) make it suited to them. Then, we take these functions and use them to construct higher-level applications, such as Logical search, Shor, and Quantum Supersampling.

By building it up in this way, we hope to convey not just a top-level understanding of what the functions are called, but what they actually do under the hood, so that readers can think about building primitives and applications of their own.

David Sachdev wrote:What are the languages and platforms that are leading the way when it comes to Quantum computing?


The QPU libraries themselves are accessible from a variety of languages. For example, the book sample code has versions which run in Python, JavaScript, C# and OpenQASM. But really if you have a QPU simulator or a physical QPU, the library functions are likely to be accessible through other languages as well (just as libraries for GPUs are).
 
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