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Ceasar Ciper

 
Greenhorn
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Hello JavaHorns,

I'm attempting a Ceasar Cipher for a FXML GUI. While I understand the GUI part(creation), I am having trouble on the Algorithmn Concepts. Are there any working demonstrations that could help?

Here is the code so far with just the Ceasar Cipher:


The problem is when trying to run the program. It says no controller specified? What does this mean?
 
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This should help to explain how the Caesar cipher operates.  Practical Cryptography Caesar Cipher.  It's a very simple idea and sometimes known as a shift cipher, since you are just shifting each letter along an alphabetical scale using a fixed number of steps.  Therefore using a shift step of three - an "a" letter would become "d".  The alphabet is used in a circular manner so a "z" would become would become a "c".  

The normal implementation of this is to take a  set of characters and convert them their numerical (integer) values in order to perform the shift addition.  They are then converted back to their character values.          
 
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