This week's book giveaway is in the Programmer Certification forum.
We're giving away four copies of OCP Oracle Certified Professional Java SE 11 Programmer I Study Guide: Exam 1Z0-815 and have Jeanne Boyarsky & Scott Selikoff on-line!
See this thread for details.
Win a copy of OCP Oracle Certified Professional Java SE 11 Programmer I Study Guide: Exam 1Z0-815 this week in the Programmer Certification forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Bear Bibeault
Sheriffs:
  • Knute Snortum
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Tim Cooke
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Holloway
  • Ron McLeod
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Paweł Baczyński
  • Piet Souris
  • Vijitha Kumara

quantum network cards, entangled with ISP hardware?

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello fellow quantum cephalopods ..

I'm pondering a device wherein qubits in household machines' PCIe hosted QPUs are coupled to ISPs' qubits.

Teleportation seems like it could then allow unpacking large payloads coupled to highly synchronized conventionally transmitted bits.

I'm a noob here, and grok the hardware less than the software.
Am I off base?
Or is this palentir possible?
.. if it is possible ..
Is it the eye of sauron?
Or a fast radio?
Neither? Both?

Can anyone fill in the conceptual gaps for this infant in a quantum sandbox?
 
Author
Posts: 28
10
C++
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Chris! Good to hear from you.
There are several "quantum internet" projects underway, and it's a hot topic of research. There are even satellite-based qubit transmission projects. One of the big challenges is that you need to send single photons (or qubits, anyway), and cannot use repeaters. That's the catch; anything which amplifies the signal will crush the quantum state, rendering it useless. The type of repeater normally considered for things like quantum encryption is a "trusted node" (basically a manned military bunker) which decrypts the data and then re-encrypts it.

As a specific answer to your questions, here are some guesses from me.
Note that nothing here claims there will be FTL communication. :]

A Completely Made-up Timeline of Home QPU Technology:

When: Today
Home hardware: Internet-connected PC
Neat things you might be able to do: Classical communication with a computer which controls a QPU. This allows you to write programs, execute them, and receive results. You can do this today, using the book sample code and the IBM Q Experience. This will also allow your mobile phone to transparently make use of QPUs without you realizing it. QRNG (quantum random number generation) which is neat, but pretty basic for a quantum computer.

When: Soonish
Home hardware: Optical fiber output (no input) port on your laptop or router, capable of sending 6 different raw single-qubit states (requires premium internet fiber package with extra sports channels)
Neat things you might be able to do: Ability to perform QKD-based quantum encryption. Ability to perform BQC (blind quantum computation) on a remote QPU, which is where the remote QPU does not know what operations you've asked it to run, and runs them anyway. This is a type of security which doesn't make sense on classical computers. A bunch of other QPU applications and experiments cooler than just digital-in/digital-out computation.

When: Also soonish
Home hardware: Hardware upgrade to optical fiber output (no input) port on your laptop or router with a mini-QPU which can generate, entangle, and measure arbitrarily rotated raw photonic qubits.
Neat things you might be able to do: Bi-directional quantum teleportation. Not sure why this is useful outside of a laboratory setting. Qubits may be stored in a spool of optical fiber, for a couple of nanoseconds per foot of fiber. Also enables all-local QRNG, so you can add a whole new level of randomness to your daily life.

When: Not as soon
Home hardware: Optical fiber bidirectional I/O port on your laptop or router, with a mini-QPU which can generate, entangle, and measure raw photonic qubits.
Neat things you might be able to do: Ability to function peer-to-peer, without a server-side QPU.

When: Even less soon
Home hardware: 1K-qubyte Fault-tolerant QPU the size of a desk, connected to laptop via digital and optical ports. $70k or so.
Neat things you might be able to do: Full-on QPU mayhem in the home.

When: 22 years after that
Home hardware: 1M-qubyte Fault-tolerant QPU inside your phone.
Neat things you might be able to do: No idea what this is for. Selfies maybe?


Note that the moment one of the readers of our book has an unexpected insight and invents the Best QPU Application Ever™️, then this table will require revision.
Maybe shape-shifting materials, doors with no hinges, or something from Diamond Age?

 
The first person to drink cow's milk. That started off as a dare from this tiny ad:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!