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Not sure if coding is right for me.

 
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Hey guys. New to the forums here and I need some career advice.

So a couple months ago, I started learning code with Javascript by taking a course on Udemy. I genuinely had fun learning it and I was close to starting my first project. But then I got discouraged along the way because I started asking myself why I want to learn code.
See I've been struggling for a really long time now trying to figure out what I want for a career. I was a biology major in my undergrad year but I don't see myself pursuing a biology career. In my senior year, I took an Intro to Computer Applied Statistics course. In that course, we touched on Microsoft Excel, SAS, R, and a little bit of Python. I liked the coursework and found it refreshing after constantly being in labs. Even though the assignments were for a class, I felt like I was more engaged rather than just studying text and then taking a text. I admit R was kinda boring but SAS was really fun to play with.

So because of that experience, I thought that coding would make for a great career path. But like I said earlier, I got discouraged. The reason is because I didn't know what I wanted to code. Games? Mobile apps? Websites? I started Javascript first because one guy on YouTube made Javascript Tetris. I felt inspired and I wanted to try my hands on remaking my own puzzle game, but instead of Tetris, I wanted to make Columns. But I had another hot question. After making that game, what do I make next?
What I'm trying to get at is that I am not creative, or at least I don't feel like I am. I was always more analytical minded instead of creative. I liked problem solving and puzzles and such which is what drew me into coding because it felt like one big puzzle to solve as I was learning. I felt mentally engaged which is one thing I want my future career path to include. But making a mandatory "portfolio" of projects for job prospects kind of eludes me. I feel like in order to pursue this kind of career, you have to be creating and full of bright ideas. I don't have any of that. I just want to problem solve, solve puzzles, and stimulate my mind. If I can somehow turn that into a job, that's what I'm looking for and I don't know if coding is for me.

However, when going over my options for careers, programming kept creeping back up in my mind and I felt the urge to learn to code again. This is why I'm feeling conflicted. I feel like this feeling isn't something I should ignore.  I've never had that kind of feeling or interest in any other career, but programming is something I find myself thinking about the most. I'm really not sure whether to pursue it or not. I don't know if I'm making the right choice right now by doing so. Please, if you guys have any advice for me, I'll take it.
 
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Sean,
Welcome to CodeRanch!

Problem solving is more important than creativity when it comes to being a good software developer!

The good thing is that your portfolio doesn't have to be creative. You can make something like the game of checkers but do so using different technologies. (ex: see here I wanted to try JUnit and here I wanted to play with Spring). Or you can do the exercises from a progamming book (Murach has good exercises.) It's just to have something to show/talk about.
 
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As Jeanne stated, you don't need to be creative to be a good professional developer. In my experience, the most important quality a developer must have are problem solving skills, endurance, and a never ending love for studying - new technologies, new patterns, new algorithms.
When you'll be a pro developer, don't worry about creativity. Customers will provide you with clever solutions you will quickly learn how to avoid and replace with working ones (ok, just kidding here...)
 
Claude Moore
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By the way:if you want to have a glimpse of what kind of issues it's likely you're going to takle as a developer, or if you want to test your own knowledge of some programming language, some framework and so on, why you don't actively participate in Coderanch forums? Read the questions, try to answer them yourself, ask the experts, post your answers and so on. I did (and I'm still doing ) so and learnt a lot.
 
Sean Fletcher
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Sean,
Welcome to CodeRanch!

Problem solving is more important than creativity when it comes to being a good software developer!

The good thing is that your portfolio doesn't have to be creative. You can make something like the game of checkers but do so using different technologies. (ex: see here I wanted to try JUnit and here I wanted to play with Spring). Or you can do the exercises from a progamming book (Murach has good exercises.) It's just to have something to show/talk about.



Hey thanks for the greeting and the reply! That makes me feel a lot better knowing my portfolio doesn't have to be creative. Do you think I should give learning code another try? Do you have any advice for a beginner looking to start a self-taught journey of code? I heard mixed reviews about coding bootcamps but I feel it would keep me motivated with deadlines as opposed to if I taught myself on something like Udemy again.
 
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