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Benefits of certification

 
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Hello guys,

If someone has got certification, please do let me know, how did the certification help you or change your career or profession? I would love to know how from their personal experience.

Listening from real incidents could be inspiring and give us ways how can certification be used in one's life to get the most out of it.

Thanks,
Ashish.
 
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Personally... I learned a lot the first time I studied for a certification.  For example, I knew access modifiers (public/protected/package-private,private) were important, but I never really used them correctly.  Coming from academia, you could just mark everything public and the code would compile!  And the goal at a lot of schools is just to make code that compiles and runs, with no concern about style, encapsulation, or reuse.  After studying for the cert, I went back and looked at earlier code and realized how silly it was.  Writing code correctly and precisely allows other developers to pick up and use the code a lot more easily. While not important in a university environment, it is critical to write readable code in a professional setting.

I doubt having a certification (or writing a certification book) has ever helped me land a job.  I went to one hiring event where other developers were far more interested in talking to me about my cert books than any of the hiring managers.  That was actually quite fun!

When I'm interviewing candidates myself, I am relieved when I see they have a Java cert.  It means they are far more likely to write readable Java code.  For example, I've seen PHP, C++, and .NET developers try to pass a Java test by writing code that was certainly not Java.  Trust me, it was not pretty.  While I've still hired candidates without any certs, I had to spend more time reviewing their coding style than those with a cert, to make sure they did know how to write good Java code.
 
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Scott Selikoff wrote:. . . the goal at a lot of schools is just to make code that compiles and runs, . . . .

I had the good fortune not to go to one of them
 
Scott Selikoff
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:

Scott Selikoff wrote:. . . the goal at a lot of schools is just to make code that compiles and runs, . . . .

I had the good fortune not to go to one of them



That's a very debatable topic.  While I personally don't like that theory-heavy schools do not emphasis software engineering at all... I do understand *why* they do it.  For example, for one class project we wrote our own database engine including support for joins.  In another, we wrote a basic operating system.  In a real painful class, we even implemented an entire multi-stage MIPS processor starting with a single NAND gate (32-bit adder, jumps, and all).  Their take is that they are teaching the theory, nothing more.  Some classes let you write the code in any language you wanted.

While this is great for learning a new topic.. it's terrible if you go for any software engineering jobs.  Anyone who is studying computer science at a theory school should seriously consider taking a software engineering class.  I did not, and wished I had!
 
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My first certification was SCJP 1.2 and I can tell you that it helped me immensely at the beginning of my career.  Studying for the certification not only made me learn a lot of Java basics but it made me remember them by heart and that made sure I never tripped in technical interviews, no matter what trick the interviewer threw at me. You know how candidates hesitate with their answers...I never had that hesitation.

BTW, SCJP used to be really really hard because 1. No books. 2. No mock exams. 3. You had to select "all" correct answers (it didn't tell the number of correct answers.).
 
Shaik Ashish
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Thanks for sharing your experience everyone. Talking about my school days , I was taught c language in those days. I always hated and was scared of that subject because of bad teaching.

I had no clue why and where semicolon is used as I used to insert it even at the end of if and while statements before the loop.

I still remember how funny was it for me to complete basic programs like even and odd, largest among three, leap year etc by taking lot of time. I hated programming to such an extent that after that semester il never get into programming.

You might plan something, but life may plan something else for you. Now I'm addicted to coding especially in Java and Python which I never thought I would be doing now.

A good teacher changes the way a student looks at subject.  My first Java teacher was so good that love for language got injected in me. From there I have been learning something new everyday in programming.
 
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