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Getting back to Java

 
Greenhorn
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I've programmed a lot of things in my career, but the last say ten years it has been mostly C#. Nevertheless if I look at the job opportunities lately, and recruiters that offer me jobs there is nowadays more demand for Java programmers..? Is that true you think? Is it worse getting the focus back on Java at this moment?

For me it is just 'job opportunity', I have no preference for either language C# or Java. I did like 10 years of C#, and before that about 5 years of Java, done the old Sun certification back in those days.
 
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Welcome to the Ranch!

It may be a regional or local trend you're seeing. Where I am and from what I've observed, it's the opposite: There seem to be more requests for .Net/C# developers than Java developers. Of course, that could also be limited by what I happen to be looking at.

I would say that C# and Java have enough similarities that as long as you have some experience in either of them, it wouldn't be too hard to transition to the other. If you've done .Net/C# for the last 10 years, that's a long time though so there may be some new things in Java that you'd want to catch up on, like generics, streams, and functional style programming constructs.

I think the important thing is to understand the underlying principles of programming. Testing and design principles are pretty much the same across languages and even platforms, so having a solid grounding in the principles allows you to more easily transition between languages, platforms, and technologies.

Good luck.
 
Marco Wentink
Greenhorn
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Well. Yes, C# and Java have many similarities. Of course I can manage in Java. I would just not be 'up to speed' in Java. I am not sure if I'd be good enough. There is a difference between being able to produce something when you have enough time and building something under time pressure .. Frankly I am a good clean but not really fast programmer.

Thank you for your advice!
 
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