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Is there a hard-copy Java magazine that would keep a Java programmer sharp and up-to-date?

 
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Hello,

My brother was a professional Java programmer for over ten years.  He's going to be away from the Internet for a couple of years and would like to stay sharp and up-to-date while he's away.

His experience has all been cross-platform, desktop and laptop development for macOS and Windows, but he is interested in learning anything and everything else about Java.  His projects have all been in Swing for the front end and Maria on the backend, since mySQL sucks now.

His level is as if he passed the following certifications:

1. Java Associate
2. Java Programmer
3. Java Developer

He's pretty good at what he does, but he wants to learn more about Java in general and to stay sharp about what he already knows.

* I want to subscribe him to a hard-copy Java magazine.  An Internet one won't work for his needs because he'll be away from computers so much of the time that he wouldn't be able to get enough screen time to learn much.

With Gratitude,

Kaydell (a guy)
 
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Kaydell,
There used to be a Java magazine, but it moved to electronic only. (I'm presuming he won't have a tablet. If he can have a tablet, load tons of e-books. Many publishers are having holiday discounts right now).

If it needs to be paper, are you allowed to mail physical books?
 
Kaydell Leavitt
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Kaydell,
There used to be a Java magazine, but it moved to electronic only. (I'm presuming he won't have a tablet. If he can have a tablet, load tons of e-books. Many publishers are having holiday discounts right now).

If it needs to be paper, are you allowed to mail physical books?



Thank you for your answer.

No, he can't have screen time on a tablets either.  Very little screen time at all.

Yes, he can have physical books, but not many.

Should he learn JavaFX, as an alternative to Swing?

If so, would the following book be good to know?
JavaFX

He'd been working for the same company for 15 years and has never been in a Java interview.  Maybe I should get him a book about how to have successful Java interviews.
One Java interview book

What do you all think?

Kind Regards,

Kaydell
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Since you have a few years, try for technologies that change slower at first. For example, databases (both SQL are noSQL) are good foundational technology. And books on design/patterns/testing are good choices.

The interview book is a great idea. And if you can mail books (vs having to choose them all up front), an annual book on new features in Java is good.
 
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Also, encourage him to think about what he can code when he gets back. Maybe he can design a game on paper and then code it when he gets home. Because he'll have a gap in coding on his resume so he'll need to show he knows current stuff.
 
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