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Kotlin vs Groovy

 
Greenhorn
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Hi Ken, I've read two of your other books - "Making Java Groovy", "Modern Java Recipes" (both are great)  - and am currently half way through "Kotlin Cookbook". Which one of these three books was more fun to write? Also, what drew you to Kotlin language to begin with, since you've been for a long time Groovy advocate/promoter? How do you compare the two languages? Given that Groovy is often cited as one of the number of programming languages that inspired/influenced Kotlin developers, I wonder if, in the same spirit, Kotlin could have a positive impact on Groovy community in return by influencing Groovy core developers to adapt some of the Kotlin's widely adapted/used features that aren't part of Groovy yet.
 
gunslinger & author
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You read both those books? Whoa. Thanks for that

Groovy is still my first love, and my favorite. What drove me to Kotlin were two issues:

* Android not only prefers Kotlin, Google now says "Kotlin first" when developing new libraries
* Gradle now has a Kotlin DSL, and I use Gradle for almost all my projects

Kotlin has a couple of features Groovy could use, like if statements returning a value and single-expression functions. Groovy is way ahead of Kotlin on features like AST transformations and just being more mature in general. There's an awful lot of Groovy in Kotlin (like the closure syntax), but arguably there's just as much if not more Scala.

The Groovy development team is well aware of Kotlin and will borrow any good ideas from it. Groovy is just that much older and more mature, so the changes are likely to be less dramatic. Btw, Groovy 3 should be out in a couple of weeks
 
Vladimir Sorensen
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Thanks for the reply and the "announcement" about new version of Groovy. I'll have to check what the new version has to offer.
 
Kenneth A. Kousen
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For the record, Groovy 3 released RC 2 (the last release candidate) about a week ago. Follow the @ApacheGroovy twitter feed to see when the full version is released. There's an InfoQ article out now about the new features, which you can find here.
 
Ranch Hand
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For the record, Groovy 3 released RC 2 (the last release candidate) about a week ago. Follow the @ApacheGroovy twitter feed to see when the full version is released. There's an InfoQ article out now about the new features, which you can find here.



Thanks for sharing the news of Groov3's release , We have used Gradle in some of earlier projects ,also we have lot of lot of groovy scripts running in  our CI/CD pipleline.
 
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