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Is it fine to partition the skill section of resume into primary skills and secondary skills?

 
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There are some technologies which are part of our main skill set. Example the ones we might have been working on while working on projects in office during last few years. There are some skills which we might have worked on many years back but not in touch since long. Then there are some skills which we learnt by practicing on our own during weekends at home on sample projects as part of self learning but not worked on in office. Mostly out of the 3 categories mentioned here, one would be currently expert at on the first category but not so on the second and third one. Instead of putting all under skills section of resume and keeping it ambiguous for the reader , is it better to partition this section into primary skills and secondary skills. The first category will come under primary skills while the second and third may come under secondary skills.  Is it fine to do this way?

thanks
 
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Around here, they like CVs to be no more than 2 pages, which is hardly sufficient as long as I've been doing things, but then again, they really don't want to hire anyone old enough to have more than 2 pages anyway.

And very frequently, the bulk of the CVs will never meet human eyes, because the demand is made of an MS-Word document which will be machine-scanned for keywords and summarily binned if it's not a good enough match. And by match, I mean "X" years with version "Y" of product Z (whether such a thing is physically possible or not). I'm afraid that Human Resource processors - and people - are not capable enough to deduce that if you have 10 years with DB2 that you just might be able to show competence with Oracle.

So where you put stuff is secondary to what's there.

On the other hand, if you do manage to get the right collection of buzzwords to get it passed on to a human, then the 2-Page Rule kicks in. So if you have any significant experience, it's best to handcraft your CV's according to the company and position you are targeting rather that expect a one-size-fits-all CV to do the job.

And if you haven't learned yet, they'd apparently prefer that you lie and claim more expertise than you have - even if it's more expertise than the product designers themselves can claim - than be honest and fail to meet the unalterable demands. Yes, I'm bitter. And cynical, because they can use a lie as an excuse to fire you if they want. Or worse, threaten you, if you're not sufficiently compliant. My own refusal to lie really upset a pair of recruiters for a local major insurance company once, because they knew I was more than capable, but would not tell a few "harmless fibs" so they couldn't advance me. It was, incidentally, DB2 versus Oracle experience.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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So where you put stuff is secondary to what's there.

On the other hand, if you do manage to get the right collection of buzzwords to get it passed on to a human, then the 2-Page Rule kicks in



thanks.I think if the resume gets shortlisted than since it clearly has primary skills and secondary skills section, the interviewer will have the idea while asking the questions whether this is primary or secondary and the candidate can tell this thing for secondary skill that I have not worked on them in office projects but practiced in sample applications at home.

I want to keep skills on which I have some expertise on under Primary Skills and keep others in Secondary Skills (examples the ones I have practiced as sample applications but not used in office projects or skills which I used in beginning of career and not used in last few years).   When I feel I have developed enough expertise on some of these secondary skills I would move those ones to Primary.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Tim Holloway wrote: really don't want to hire anyone old enough to have more than 2 pages anyway.
.



What is the reason why they do not prefer resumes more than 2 page long?
 
Monica Shiralkar
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In career we would have worked on so many things but some are not being used often/recently and thus one may not be in good touch with those.
In that case would it make sense to such skills in a kind of secondary section named such as "other skills" to indicate you have worked on these for sometimg in career but are in good touch with Primary skills and not these .
 
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Monica,

It is very simple: if you have more than 2 pages you are either too old (senior) to be viable asset to the company (which is age discrimination in the US and illegal) or you cannot hold a job, which, if the case, you are a poor risk to any company.

Les

Monica Shiralkar wrote:

Tim Holloway wrote: really don't want to hire anyone old enough to have more than 2 pages anyway.
.



What is the reason why they do not prefer resumes more than 2 page long?

 
Monica Shiralkar
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Les Morgan wrote:if you have more than 2 pages you are either too old (senior) to be viable asset to the company


Thanks.In that case is it fine to remove old experience (old companies and/or old projects ) from the resume and keep only the newer ones ?
 
Les Morgan
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I only give 3 to 5 jobs and tell them further experience available upon request.
 
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Monica Shiralkar wrote:Thanks.In that case is it fine to remove old experience (old companies and/or old projects ) from the resume and keep only the newer ones ?



I would certainly do that. Otherwise, imagine that after 20 years of work you're looking for a new job. Do you put in the job you did as an intern 20 years ago? That isn't going to be interesting to anybody who might want to hire you.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Paul Clapham wrote:
I would certainly do that. Otherwise, imagine that after 20 years of work you're looking for a new job. Do you put in the job you did as an intern 20 years ago? That isn't going to be interesting to anybody who might want to hire you.



Means in that case not even putting a one liner project description about what one did many years back ? And not even writing that experience in resume and saying you only have these many years of experience (a reduced figure ).?
 
Les Morgan
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in my resume, i put exactly how many years of experience that i have in the industry.  I've about 40+ years now in the industry, but progamming i have about 35 and degreed work at programming about 30.  i put my total programming time down about 30 years.  I put my last 3 maybe 5 jobs down--usually 3, but that encompasses over 25 years of experience.  I've never had anyone ask for those extra 4+ years of listings.

Monica Shiralkar wrote:

Paul Clapham wrote:
I would certainly do that. Otherwise, imagine that after 20 years of work you're looking for a new job. Do you put in the job you did as an intern 20 years ago? That isn't going to be interesting to anybody who might want to hire you.



Means in that case not even putting a one liner project description about what one did many years back ? And not even writing that experience in resume and saying you only have these many years of experience (a reduced figure ).?

 
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