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TypeScript Quickly: One common programming language for front-end and back-end?

 
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While looking at the contents of the book "TypeScript Quickly", a note took my attention which said, "I’ve seen the future and it is TypeScript". Does that mean that TypeScript can even run on Back-end server where it can perform transactions? Is the note trying to say that there shall be a common programming language that shall run on front-end as well as back-end and that developers shall have only one common programming language viz. TypeScript? If that's true, please explain how is this possible?
 
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You can use TypeScript and write code and compile it to JavaScript that will be deployed on the Node.js.  In Part 2 of the book, we show how to do it.
Also, the creator of Node.js works on another server called Deno, which is a runtime for TypeScript so you don't even need to compile the code (see https://deno.land/std/manual.md).
 
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This might start a new revolution in programming industry where there shall be one language for front-end as well as back-end. Frameworks need to be developed though which offer features like dependency injection and persistence. Indeed a long way to go...
 
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JavaScript was originally designed as a back-end language, only to achieve prominence on the client end, then more recently being widespread on the back end as well.

But JavaScript is not as robust as Java. Java has better security overall, a wealth of powerful libraries, and features for scalability. As a rule, it's more efficient in CPU usage, and the strong typing mandated by the language reduces the likelihood of surprise failures long after the system has gone into production.

I use NodeJS for my quick-and-dirty projects. But I still prefer Java for the "heavy lifting" stuff.
 
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