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Not sure if I'm cut out for this

 
Greenhorn
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I'm overwhelmed and curious if in your more experienced opinion it's more advisable to pursue another language.

I've been learning java in hopes of getting a job.  I'm going through job requirements, and I feel I'm wasting my time. The listings vary a lot, but they seem to throw everything they can.
Often they want me to know other languages/ be fullstack. Whereas I look at Javascript listings, what's required looks manageable.

I don't know javascript. But ahead of me in java, I have Spring, J2EE, hibernate at minimum(I think). Maybe that's shorter, but java may still ask for more.
I do know javascript has extra stuff too, but am I misguided to think it's reasonable to switch?

 
Marshal
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In my opinion, Javascript is no less complicated to learn than Java. JavaScript has a plethora of frameworks and being more dynamic in nature that Java, it requires far more discipline on the part of the developer. As an inexperienced programmer, I think JavaScript would be like the Wild Wild West for you -- there are more things that can bite you if you're not careful.
 
Jj Varg
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Thanks for the response. I don't so much  struggle to write code or understand java. It's just the different tools and different subjects to learn. My understanding for javascript is that it's front end and I can focus on web development. With java I haven't been sure what basket my hand is in or what's smart. If they're both no less complicated, well then it's time to rethink some things. Thanks again.
 
Junilu Lacar
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Jj Varg wrote:My understanding for javascript is that it's front end and I can focus on web development.


I guess you've never heard of Node.js then...
 
Junilu Lacar
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I watched a talk by Bob Martin yesterday on the topic of the future of programming. A few important points:

1. The "old guard" did a lot of fantastic things with technology that is orders of magnitude more "primitive" than what we have today. One example: they got men to the moon. These people were professionals, highly skilled, and didn't need a whole lot of management: they knew how to deal with deadlines, how to deliver with quality, how to manage their work. That's because they were trained as engineers, scientists, and mathematicians.

2. The ranks of our profession seems to double every 5 years. That means that we are perpetually inexperienced: at least half of all the developers out there have less than five years of experience. They are destined to commit the same mistakes and learn the hard-earned lessons that older generations of programmers had learned.

3. If the new generations of software developers don't learn the discipline of software development, if they keep chasing after the new technologies, the new languages, the new "best thing", and forget about the basics: how to design, how to test, how to write quality code, how to communicate and collaborate, then we are in a lot of trouble.

4. Software developers rule the world in ways people don't understand, in ways we don't even understand. You can't do anything these days without interfacing with software. Cars, phones, TV, buying things, selling things, almost everything we do involves something that has software in it.

5. Technologies will change and evolve. There are always going to be new languages and frameworks to learn. If you keep chasing after technologies and languages, you're going to end up being like a dog chasing its own tail. If you want to last long in this business, don't focus solely on technologies. Practice technique, learn good practices, learn about principles, learn about HOW to develop good software, learn the art and craft of software development. That's what's really hard but that's what's really important in the long run.
 
Jj Varg
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Junilu Lacar wrote:
I guess you've never heard of Node.js then...


Not really, but I see now. I've heard in the past it was common to have javascript jobs that mostly focus on frontend, and use another language for backend.
Let me say, I have little knowledge of frontend responsibilities. I see what you mean by saying it's as complex if you're meaning to say, you can end up doing backend too.
 
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You are still approaching the problem from the wrong end. It isn't a case of whether you are writing frontend code or backend code, but the principles of producing apps in the first place. Junilu has written abut it; please have another look at his post.
 
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