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Benchmarking the Raspberry Pi 4

 
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Specifications
SoC: Broadcom BCM2711B0 quad-core A72 (ARMv8-A) 64-bit @ 1.5GHz
GPU: Broadcom VideoCore VI @ 500MHz
RAM: 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB LPDDR4–3200 SDRAM (4GB as reviewed)
Networking: Gigabit Ethernet, 2.4GHz and 5GHz 802.11b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi
Bluetooth: Bluetooth 5.0, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)
Storage: MicroSD
GPIO: 40-pin GPIO header, populated
Ports: 2x micro-HDMI 2.0, 3.5mm analogue audio-video jack, 2x USB 2.0, 2x USB 3.0, Ethernet, Camera Serial Interface (CSI), Display Serial Interface (DSI)
Dimensions: 88mm x 58mm x 19.5mm, 46g

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Thermal Benchmark:


Raspberry Pi 4 Model B Thermal Benchmark:


Power Draw Benchmark:


Thermal Throttling Benchmark:


Linpack Benchmark:


Memory Throughput Benchmark:


File Compression Benchmark:


GIMP Image Editing Benchmark:


SpeedoMeter 2 Browser Benchmark:


OpenArena gaming benchmark:


Gpiozero benchmark:


Ethernet throughput benchmark:


WiFi throughput benchmark:


USB throughput benchmark:


MicroSD storage benchmark:
 
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Thank you very much!

I didn't have a thermal camera, but based on touch, I can vouch for the hotspots. I also learned that the rectangular chip next to the big hot square one is best left alone. I tried to put a heatsink on it and it caused the Pi to malfunction. Closer inspection shows me that there are two small components right next to it that are slightly taller than the top of the chip and apparently get shorted out. Fortunately that particular chip doesn't get very hot.

Incidentally, I'm using one as a video recorder/media manager with only passive fin heatsinks (no fan) and it['s extremely reliable in open air. In theory, video transcoding should be giving it a good workout, although I haven't measured.

Some practical notes. The claim has been made that a Pi 4 can completely replace your desktop. In truth, I've not had significant issues using even a Pi 3 for "office tasks" and running CNC control, but on the Pi 4, I went whole hog.

On a 1GB Pi 4, I concurrently ran a web browser, the Arduino IDE (which is a Java app), and Emacs - the operating system that pretends it's a text editor.

You don't want to do that, actually. I didn't see CPU performance issues, but Java eats a lot of memory and web browsers are notorious pigs. A single Gigabyte of RAM can't accomodate all that and virtual memory started thrashing. So hard, in fact, that sometimes it was faster to reboot than to wait for the storm to subside.

I expect that my 4GB Pi 4 probably won't have this issue, although until I finish a current project I won't be able to confirm that. Once the 1GB unit is freed up, I can simply swap SD cards, which is very convenient.

I hope they don't discontinue the Pi 3, though. It may not scream like the Pi 4, but it's much more energy efficient and more than adequate to run my audio apps and stuff like that.
 
Lucian Maly
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@Tim Holloway

I'm actually primarily using Pi3 because of the power consumption reasons and i bought cheap heatsinks on eBay to prevent it from overheating (although it is not overclocked) and to significantly increase lifespan/longevity in case they would discontinue it.
 
Tim Holloway
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My CNC is in the garage, since it's loud, scary, and generates dust. It runs off a Pi 3 which is in an enclosure that has lots of holes, but neither heat sinks nor forced air. Never had a problem with it, and I'll use it at temperatures up to 95°F. I haven't paid too much attention to the CPU load, but I did have to switch from a Java control program to a native binary. The Pi port of Java isn't as heavily-optimized as the desktop versions I think and it couldn't keep up with the CNC hardware.

I haven't actually overheated the Pi 4, but those little stick-on heatsinks are cheap, so why not?
 
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