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Which version of Java is generally used these days for new projects in companies ?

 
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Although the latest version of Java is Java 1.11 ,in our organization, we are using Java 1.8.On my personal laptop,I installed Java 1.11. I think the exact latest version (Java 1.11) may not be getting used in most companies. What is the version of Java that is generally being used these days for any new projects?thanks
 
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Most companies likely use LTS (long term support) versions. At the moment that's Java 8 and Java 11. The next one will be Java 17, due out in September 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_version_history has some details on the release timeline. Note that not all JDKs are available from all JDK sources - e.g. AdoptOpenJDK, where I get my JDKs, only supports 8, 11 and 15 at the moment.

Note that neither Java 1.8 nor 1.11 exist - it's Java 8 and Java 11.

 
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Tim Moores wrote:Most companies likely use LTS (long term support) versions. At the moment that's Java 8 and Java 11.



What about the ones in between like Java 10?
 
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Tim Moores wrote:.

Note that neither Java 1.8 nor 1.11 exist - it's Java 8 and Java 11.



Oh thanks for correcting me .I have always been thinking that we say the JDK version as the Java version for e.g if it is JDK 1.6 ,I used to call as Java 1.6.  So it is not like the JDK version .
 
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Monica Shiralkar wrote:Oh thanks for correcting me .I have always been thinking that we say the JDK version as the Java version for e.g if it is JDK 1.6 ,I used to call as Java 1.6.  So it is not like the JDK version .



It used to be like that, up to Java 1.4. Then in 2004 Java 5 was released. It hasn't been "Java 1.x" since then.
 
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Monica Shiralkar wrote:
What about the ones in between like Java 10?


They are supported for just 6 months, making them not worthwhile installing on production machines. Developers might use them, though, and they might be used on systems that are not critical.
 
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Paul Clapham wrote:

Monica Shiralkar wrote:Oh thanks for correcting me .I have always been thinking that we say the JDK version as the Java version for e.g if it is JDK 1.6 ,I used to call as Java 1.6.  So it is not like the JDK version .



It used to be like that, up to Java 1.4. Then in 2004 Java 5 was released. It hasn't been "Java 1.x" since then.



Thanks a lot. I have been calling it incorrectly.
 
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Tim Moores wrote:

Monica Shiralkar wrote:
What about the ones in between like Java 10?


They are supported for just 6 months, making them not worthwhile installing on production machines. Developers might use them, though, and they might be used on systems that are not critical.



Thanks. One may still have to understand the new features introduced in them though. I installed the latest Eclipse on my personal laptop and it came with Java 15. In that case the most used version after Java 8 looks like to be Java 11. Another thing I observed that the previous time I installed Eclipse, it was just a simple download and extract. This time it did installation using exe and also its name did not come like Neon, Oxygen etc its name shows as Eclipse 2020-9.

 
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Monica Shiralkar wrote:One may still have to understand the new features introduced in them though.


Not really. If you're a software company developing software for big companies that still have old Java runtimes running in production, and your developers are familiar with that Java version and not with a newer version, what's the point of learning the newer Java features, unless the client decides to upgrade their runtime?
 
Monica Shiralkar
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I meant a Java developer should be having an idea atleast on what new features have been added to the language to stay updated.
 
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I agree with you if your company mainly uses Java.

However, what if all your new solutions are written in C# and you're just maintaining some old Java software for a customer that's running Java 7? Learning Java 8 or Java 11 is pointless because you can't use it anyway, and if you want to write a completely new version you might as well write it in C# if that's what your developers use on the daily.

It's good if your developers want to stay up to date with the latest Java version, and they can install the latest version on their development machine. Test environments however should use LTS versions, and Acceptance environments should match the version that the customer is running.
 
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Stephan van Hulst wrote:I agree with you if your company mainly uses Java.

However, what if all your new solutions are written in C# and you're just maintaining some old Java software for a customer that's running Java 7? Learning Java 8 or Java 11 is pointless because you can't use it anyway, and if you want to write a completely new version you might as well write it in C# if that's what your developers use on the daily.

It's good if your developers want to stay up to date with the latest Java version, and they can install the latest version on their development machine. Test environments however should use LTS versions, and Acceptance environments should match the version that the customer is running.



I feel, irrespective of the company we are working for ,it is our responsibility to keep our core competencies sharp.
 
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Monica Shiralkar wrote:I feel, irrespective of the company we are working for ,it is our responsibility to keep our core competencies sharp.


Certainly. But you were asking about what is used in projects, not what one might do to further one's career.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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On my personal laptop I installed Java 15 and for the first time ever I could type statements like the below in Eclipse :
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Stephan van Hulst wrote:Test environments however should use LTS versions, and Acceptance environments should match the version that the customer is running.



Thanks
That's an important point.
 
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