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What exactly does it mean that MongoDb is cross platform compliant

 
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MongoDb is said to be cross platform compliant. Does it mean that other NoSQL databases like Hbase ,Cassandra aren't so.What difference does it actually make while using the DB ?

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I don't know their official definition, but most importantly MongoDB runs under Linux, Windows, and MacOS. It also runs under BSD Unix and Solaris. Apparently not, however, under IBM's zOS, assuming you have a mainframe comuter handly, and that's unfortunate, because I've always considered MongoDB documents to be a lot like Notes documents. Although IBM sold off Lotus Notes/Domino a few years back.

What's really important when selecting a product is that the platform(s) you expect to use it on are supported. Generally the quickest way to check that is to go it the product's Wikipedia page and look at the sidebar.

To be fully platform compliant in my book, the different OS implementations of a product should all implement the same essential functionality and ideally be capable of free data interchange. IBM's DB/2, for example, is similar (but not identical) on Linux, Windows, iSeries and zOS platforms, but getting a database from one platform to any other (except maybe Linux-Windows) was virtually impossible without resorting to third-pary tools last time I had to deal with that.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Tim Holloway wrote:getting a database from one platform to any other (except maybe Linux-Windows)



What does this mean ?
 
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It means that you cannot just copy DB2 files from an iSeries computer to a Windows DB2 computer and use them.

Nor was there a common dump/load file format that could be used to export from one DB2 platform to another.

In order to transport DB2 data, it was necessary to manually re-create the source schema on the target machine and use a third-party utility to extract the data from the tables and construct SQL INSERT statements to apply to the target tables. Which is slow and error-prone.

In contrast, the newer (and cheaper) open-source MySQL and PostgreSQL databases have always been able to dump/restore SQL using their own utilities and feature additional optimizations for that process as well.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Tim Holloway wrote:It means that you cannot just copy DB2 files from an iSeries computer to a Windows DB2 computer and use them.

Nor was there a common dump/load file format that could be used to export from one DB2 platform to another.

In order to transport DB2 data, it was necessary to manually re-create the source schema on the target machine and use a third-party utility to extract the data from the tables and construct SQL INSERT statements to apply to the target tables. Which is slow and error-prone.

In contrast, the newer (and cheaper) open-source MySQL and PostgreSQL databases have always been able to dump/restore SQL using their own utilities and feature additional optimizations for that process as well.



And MongoDb being cross platform compliant meant such a thing is possible in MongoDb unlike some other noSQL DBs?
 
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Monica Shiralkar wrote:
And MongoDb being cross platform compliant meant such a thing is possible in MongoDb unlike some other noSQL DBs?

Since the term "cross platform compliant" has no formal meaning, no.

However, unless I'm mistaken, MongoDB can dump to YAML and/or JSON and they are about as cross-platform as anything you'll ever find.
 
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Thanks
 
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Are you sure you don't mean "cross platform compatible"? That would make a lot more sense for a software product.
 
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Monica Shiralkar wrote:And MongoDb being cross platform compliant meant such a thing is possible in MongoDb unlike some other noSQL DBs?



You know, programmers are supposed to have a reasonable grasp of basic logic. So I suggest you apply your grasp of basic logic to that statement. If object X has property Y, does it therefore follow that other objects do not have property Y?
 
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