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What is the difference between an IP(intellectual property) application and a normal application?

 
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What is an IP(Intellectual Property) Application.How is it different from normal application? thanks

I was not sure which would be the pertaining coderanch forum to post this.
 
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Can you point us to where you read/heard about "IP applications"? It's not a term that is widely used (or at all).

Edit: Is https://www.akamai.com/de/de/products/performance/ip-application-accelerator.jsp what you're asking about?
 
Monica Shiralkar
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In office we were shown a presentation on the work in pipeline. There along with other applications, it was said that we would also be later doing some IP Development. I checked online on what is IP and it says Intellectual Property.
 
Tim Moores
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IP can be short for many things: https://www.abbreviations.com/IP Internet Protocol or Image processing are as likely. But there are too many to guess - better ask whoever gave that presentation.
 
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Eery application counts as intellectual property, which belongs to its creator. In the case of something made at work that you are paid to do, the “creator” is the employing company.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:Eery application counts as intellectual property, which belongs to its creator. In the case of something made at work that you are paid to do, the “creator” is the employing company.



Thanks. Does that mean if some developers work on any product in any company, then it is surely an Intellectual Property?
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Yes. In that case the IP belongs to the creator.
 
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Current legal conditions in the USA are, I believe, as follows.

Software is copyrightable (this was not always so).
Any copyrightable work is automatically copyrighted when it's produced. Again, this is USA copyright here, and it supersedes an older practice where you had to formally register the work with the US Copyright Office..
If we assume that anything copyrightable is Intellectual Property, we now have a logical syllogism and I leave it to you to tale it to its conclusion.

The copyright always begins with the author(s) of a work. However, software produced as an employee falls under the concept of Work For Hire, where the author passes copyright on to the employer. Some corporations take this to an extreme - any work you do on company time using company resources is theirs and anything you do on your own time with your own resources is theirs. I'll ignore the complications that come if you employ company trade secrets to produce a work. That just make it more theirs (usually!)

Work done as an independent contractor may or may not be considered as Work for Hire, so there's typically language in the contract that indicates what does and doesn't become property of the contractee. That's especially important for example, if I develop a custom webserver that I use for all projects that I create webapps for and I don't want someone else to own that part - just the apps written for it. You might not create your own webapp server, but a lot of people do create their own web application frameworks and libraries, and the same thing applies there.

 
Monica Shiralkar
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Is there any difference between product (which developers develop in any product based company ) and an Intellectual Property ?
 
Tim Holloway
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Bottled water is a product. Water is not an intellectual property.

The design of the bottles would be someone's intellectual property, but the seller of the bottled water often does not make the bottles, and the manufacturer of the bottles uses the IP to produce the bottles, but does not pass any IP on to the bottle purchaser.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Tim Holloway wrote:Bottled water is a product. Water is not an intellectual property.

The design of the bottles would be someone's intellectual property, but the seller of the bottled water often does not make the bottles, and the manufacturer of the bottles uses the IP to produce the bottles, but does not pass any IP on to the bottle purchaser.


Thanks
Water bottles are being designed everywhere .So in every case the design is intellectual property or it has to be unique or have something special to be intellectual property ?
 
Tim Holloway
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The patent system is a means of assigning ownership to an intellectual property, just as copyrights are. It's quite common for independent developers to create designs that are similar, if not identical. Since patents  permit their owners to license that property to others, a great deal of effort goes into working out who owns what. The bottle manufacturer, for example, may not own the patents for the bottles that they produce. Independent inventors working in their basements are a stereotype with good reason. The Super-Soaker water gun was designed and patented by a NASA engineer using (as far as I know) no NASA IP or resources. The Slinky spring toy was actually a failed materials experiment where the employer did not attempt to claim ownership of any IP (that I know of).

Not all "Intellectual Property" can be claimed. Mathematical forumulas, for example, are considered to be part of the basic structure of the Universe and no one has yet managed to lay legal claim to the entire Universe.

A patent is supposed to claim a novel design or process that was non-intuitive. Again, fire, the wheel, and so forth are not patentable, but a disk-shaped rolling object with a rubber rim could be patented.

In the copyright area, George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord" was considered IP infringement because even though it had a completely different meaning and lyrics from "He's So Fine"*, it was virtually note-for-note identical. More recently, however, a protracted court fight has just been resolved over a sequence in Led Zepplin's "Stairway to Heaven".

---
* Harrison later wrote a song whose lyrics said, in part, "this song. as far as I know, doesn't violate Copyright Law".
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Thanks
 
Tim Moores
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Keep in mind that intellectual property is governed by laws that may vary considerably from country to country.

Also keep in mind that "IP" can be short for a lot of things; have you ascertained yet whether that is intellectual property in this case? It's unlikely, IMO.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Tim Holloway wrote:Bottled water is a product. . . . .

Yes, you can go and find water, which already exists and put it into bottles. The concept of a bottle is old enough that it doesn't count as copyrightable nor patentable, but if somebody invents a novel bottle top that might be patentable. That means the designer can demand payment for each top of that design made.
Intellectual property is a big thing in PhD theses, etc. It is possible to delay publication of a successful thesis for up to two years so its author can investigate whether there is any intellectual property in it that can be used to earn money.
 
Tim Holloway
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:... if somebody invents a novel bottle top that might be patentable.



Not just the bottle top. https://time.com/4105134/coke-bottle/

You'd think that screws and nails would be too generic to be patented. You'd be wrong. The alloy composition, the precise shape of the head, point, and body, the manufacturing process and machinery, all under patents.

A common mark on almost everything when I was much younger was "pat. pending" (patent pending approval). It was so ubiquitous that a cartoon character was even named "Pat Pending". I don't recall having seen such a notation in a long time. Perhaps the approval process is now fast enough that it's not necessary.

US Patents, unlike copyrights, have a relatively limited lifespan and renewal. But don't go cloning Coke bottle shapes. I think they're now recognized as Trade Marks.
 
Monica Shiralkar
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Tim Moores wrote:have you ascertained yet whether that is intellectual property in this case? .


I think it is so as the work for which it was being said is a product and not regular service industry work .
 
Tim Moores
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That means nothing. That could apply as well to any of the other things IP stands for.
 
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