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what else I can study while preparing for the certification to get ready for a job interview?

 
Greenhorn
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Hi,
I just bought OCP Java 11 Developer complete study guide to prepare myself for the certification. I have read Head first Java already and want to study other subjects that would help me land a software developer Job.
Just out of curiosity I keep checking jobs in my area and most of the employers ask for knowledge in company specific software they are using.
I have a bit of knowledge of SQL language and design and analysis of algorithms.
All I need is some guidance on what else I can learn to increase my chances of getting hired.
I have interest in android development. Any books that someone can recommend? I have signed myself up for a Udemy android course by Tim Buchalka.

Here is an example of Job Listing in my local area and I have no clue what they are talking about?

"Android SDK, Android Studio, Core Java, Kotlin.
Experience in design patterns like MVP, MVVM.
Familiarity with RESTFul APIs to connect Android applications to back-end services
Native and third-party frameworks/libraries such as Retrofit, Dagger, or Firebase would be beneficial.
Hands-on BDD, TDD, Unit testing, CI/CD and Scrum Ceremonies (preferred)
Understanding of code versioning tools such as Git or SVN
Understanding of Android design principles and interface guidelines
Adhere to established standards of quality for coding and documentation
Self-starter eager to learn new technologies; enthusiastic about researching opportunities to grow and improve your skill set"

I know half of my issues will be resolved when I start working on a project but I need a path to follow.
Can someone guide me on how to approach this situation?

Also, I am sorry if I posted this under wrong forum title. I am new here and trying to learn how this website functions.

Thank you so much!
 
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Welcome to the Ranch.

That job ad is for a mobile development job. Trying to figure it out will not help you with the certification, so if that's your top priority right now, I advise to ignore it. If most of that ad makes no sense to you, then I think it's safe to say you have a long way to go. Android is based on Java 8, for the most part, though, so a Java 11 cert may not help you much with that. But nothing stops you from starting Android development if you have time aside from your cert exam preparation.

RESTful APIs are something you will encounter in lots of places, so it would make sense to learn those (I'm not sure if those are included in the cert exam, though).
 
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Also, I am sorry if I posted this under wrong forum title. I am new here and trying to learn how this website functions.


Welcome to the Ranch, no need to apologize, we've all been there

As Tim said, OCP certification won't help you much with getting an Android developer job, but it won't hurt either. So if you have the time you can study for it. Depending on which companies you interview with, Algorithms/Data-Structures, problem solving or aptitude might also be part of the interview.

Just out of curiosity I keep checking jobs in my area and most of the employers ask for knowledge in company specific software they are using.


These type of requirements are never a must have, they are always a good to have. If you are familiar with Android development for example, it won't take much time to start using any Android framework or library. You can read intro of these frameworks if you want, but your focus should be getting basics and concepts clear.

Any books that someone can recommend?


I've personally not gone through any Android training or books recently, but you can go for free trials of Lynda or Pluralsight and explore the courses there.
 
Greenhorn
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A warm welcome to the Ranch

Just my 2 cents here. Since I don't know your rationale for applying for that job and the criteria, this won't be a reaction to your list but rather on other essential stuff to get your foot between the door.

Regarding the OCP. For me it's a stepping stone just to understand Java better and adds to become better in software engineering in general. So, IMHO, OCP wouldn't directly help in your interview, but indirectly it does in the long run.

From the company's perspective
Most of the time they are looking for people that can solve problem, IMHO.
In this light, the language, frameworks etc, can be seen as tools. So, if you can prove you can solve problems 'somehow', and you can convince them of your 'eagerness'. They will do the math: give this guy some time and we'll be fine.

In my eyes, software engineering is largely about communication. If you are able to articulate the problem definition clearly, having the ability to analyse, discuss and detail out the things,  you'd probably be a valuable asset, or better yet, a good team-player in the organisation.
Bottomline: you can go through tons of trainings, workshop, tutorials to get knowledge and prepare endlessly, but if you work/meet on the above criteria, you have a big advantage.

Good luck!
 
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Aditya Mahla wrote: most of the employers ask for knowledge in company specific software they are using.


I'm not seeing anything company specific in the list you posted.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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