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Math for Programmers: New Engineers Training etc

 
Greenhorn
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So I went to Amazon and looked up the book and I could see the table of contents there but not really any examples of the text. I have been working in an environment that is very math "heavy" for years. I work on topic that include georegistration, 3 space vehicular orientation, ballistics targeting etc. Do you think your book has content that will help my new engineers acquire the skills to work in these areas? And why? And possibly share an example from the book ... maybe a 3 space rotation problem or something like that please.

//geb
 
Author
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Hi!  I'm delighted to hear you're considering Math for Programmers to train your new engineers.  This is exactly the use case I had in mind when I sat down to write this book.

Some topics include: 2D and 3D linear transformations, including matrix representations.  Numerical differentiation and integration (but no fancy algorithms), Euler's method to simulate a physics engine.  Then gradient descent for optimization and regression.

At a minimum, the book should help your new engineers gain some confidence on linear algebra and spatial reasoning, especially if they are coming from non-mathy programming domains.

Best,
Paul
 
Galen Benson
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They do usually have good math backgrounds usually MS in CS, Physics or Electrical Engineers. The EE's especially don't seem to have the Liner Algebra, The CS folks sometimes do and sometimes don't. The Physics folks are usually get the math but they are not Software experts. So I'm in a build you're own environment. Thanks for the info.
 
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Why use Amazon if you can see the whole content of the book on manning website for free?
 
Marshal
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Mike Savvy wrote:. . . you can see the whole content of the book on manning website for free?

You mean the whole table of contents, surely. Manning only allow you to see part of the book free of charge. They let me see the whole of the book, but I did buy a copy.
 
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