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Hello All,

Currently I am studying a general computer science course, which includes subjects such as Java and Python. It also covers general items such as connections, wireless and wired, and the technologies behind this.

This course is supposed to be at bachelors level. Personally I question the quality of the course, as I do not feel like I am learning anything. Exams I pass easy with a 95%+ average, and I can easily replicate their code examples and get it working. Looking at other projects online, I feel like I do not understand enough of it, and don't get the support from the university course.

Now I feel like I need to do something extra, to get ready for the job market. I would like to get into the java side of the job market, to start with, purely as a entry point. I've been looking at the OCPJP exam for java 11. Would studying this material, and passing this exam, give me a good entry point into the job market, or are there other things I really need to study, that are essential to get a starters job?

Thanks, Gosse.
 
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Welcome to the Ranch

Where are you reading this course? How do you manage to get 95%? In most BSc courses, 60%+ counts as a “good” mark (≡2i). I would expect a computer sciences course to include algorithms and data structures, principles of computing, logic, databases, etc., as well as simple language work.
 
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:Welcome to the Ranch

Where are you reading this course? How do you manage to get 95%? In most BSc courses, 60%+ counts as a “good” mark (≡2i). I would expect a computer sciences course to include algorithms and data structures, principles of computing, logic, databases, etc., as well as simple language work.



I am studying the course at the open University in the UK. Done modules such as the algorithms one, which was done with mainly python, exploring the big o stuff. Did not go very in depth to be honest.

The java module says it covers enough for a BSc but would not be anywhere near for example a old OCA exam.  I do not know how I score so well, as others seem to struggle with it. I just do not feel like I am learning anything, and would like to get myself ready for a job in the industry, considering I'm in my final year.
 
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I went to an in person university and it didn't prepare me for the OCA either. I don't college is designed to do that. Nor is a job. That's why study guides exist .

That said, when you interview for a job, interviewers will want to see internship experience or a project you did for fun. So signing up for a free github.com account and writing some code (ex: a game) gives you something to talk about at your interview besides school.

If others are struggling and you are doing well, it suggests you have an affinity for the topic. Which is good to have in a career . Learning more is still good though and will help set you apart.
 
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:. . . . I don't [think] college is designed to do that. Nor is a job. That's why study guides exist .

No, the cert exams test knowledge completely different from what you learn at University and also different from what you use on the job. Somebody like Liutauras or Tim C will know a lot more than me, but I think people get an entry level job and then work for a cert later, or more frequently, an MSc.
And let's have a “disclosure of interests” about how many cert exam guides you wrote

. . . internship experience or a project you did for fun.

Same on this side of the Pond. Many courses here are four‑year “thick” sandwich courses. That includes a year's internship . . . with a salary attached. The teaching staff visit every student on industrial placement to verify they are still there . . . and to verify that they are being given something wothwhile to do.

. . . you have an affinity for the topic. . . ..

I hope you are right and not that the assignments are set too easy. If GK shows us some code, we can have a look at it and it should be easy to assess its quality.
Open Univrsity is sort of “in person”. Although much of the teaching is delivered via TV the Net, students should meet a supervisor in person regularly and go away for intensive short courses. Maybe that interaction has been lost under CoViD; Universities have been very keen to minimise the risk of appearing on the front page of thee newspaper as, “983645837629856239846593874 CoViD cases at XYZ University”.
 
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He means 95% from a university which is open from UK by fee.
 
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