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Java EE from scratch

 
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For Learning Java EE7, what server should I use : Eclispe/GlassFish and why ?

What IDE I should use : Eclipse/NetBeans ?

What apps books/free-resources I should use ?

Oracle tutorial is written based on glassfish and netbeans. Please give me some suggestions and definitive guideline please.

I faced difficulty installing glassfish on eclipse. will tomcat work instead of glassfish for learning JavaEE ?
 
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It's all just personal preference. Oracle's tutorials use GlassFish and Netbeans because those are their own tools. You can use any other IDE or JEE container. However, some of the instructions may not work. For Netbeans vs Eclipse vs IntelliJ that's obvious; for GlassFish vs other JEE container there are less likely going to be issues until they start using container-specifics. One such example is security domain mappings.

For the JEE container you can go for GlassFish, or an alternative like WildFly. I don't recommend WebLogic, as I don't think it's very beginner-friendly. (To be honest, it wasn't friendly to me either...). Tomcat is not an option, as it only supports the web part of JEE. Without additional libraries (where TomEE comes in), you're limited to servlets and JSPs.
 
Md Zuanyeed Kamal
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Rob Spoor wrote:

For the JEE container you can go for GlassFish, or an alternative like WildFly. I don't recommend WebLogic, as I don't think it's very beginner-friendly. (To be honest, it wasn't friendly to me either...). Tomcat is not an option, as it only supports the web part of JEE. Without additional libraries (where TomEE comes in), you're limited to servlets and JSPs.


I tried to install glassfish on eclipse, but I failed to do that. I am still not sure should I install netbeans ? or I would try to install glassfish on eclipse. I have never user weblogic before.

Purpose of doing all this it to explore Java EE. Incase you have good tutorials/documents on how to install glassfish on eclipse you can share .

thanks

 
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I'm going to differ with Rob here. Disclaimer: I'm a long-time forum moderator for the Tomcat forum, so I do have a bit of a bias.

The main advantage of Tomcat is that it's lightweight and simple to install and maintain. True, it does not support the advanced features of JEE, but when you're first starting out, servlets and JSPs are enough of a challenge in their own right, Furthermore, Tomcat is not a toy - it's a primary production webapp server in many, many IT shops. In fact I've worked in environments where it was the only webapp server product being used.

Once you're comfortable with servlets and JSPs, connection pools, JNDI, security Realms and the other basic services that Tomcat can offer you you have several options. You'll need to consider them once you advance to JPA/EJB, JavaServer Faces, JMS and other "power" services You can do this in one of 3 ways:

1. By adding libraries to your WARs to support them. There are ready-to-run implementations of JSF, and actually several different implementations of JPA, including Hibernafe JPA and Apache OpenJPA.

2. By upgrading to TomEE, which is Tomcat with these features actually integrated into Tomcat, making it a full-stack server.

3. By migrating to a true full-stack server like WebSphere, Glashfish, Wildfly or WebLogic.

There is no "correct" solution. All of the above are popular and in wide use in business. TomEE is perhaps the less popular option, but we do have some strong TomEE fans here on the Ranch.

In actual employment, you may not be given a choice of which IDE you can use, but for personal development it doesn't matter. In my experience, IntelliJ is friendliest towards basic application development, Eclipse is perhaps the most flexible, and NetBeans I cannot vouch for personally (last time I used "NetBeans" it was owned by Sun and had an entirely different name), but we have plenty of NetBeans fans here on the Ranch.

I'll issue the standard caution that we like to say that the "best" "IDE" to learn Java with is a simple text-edit program. IDEs can "help" you create stuff that you won't understand, but if you design and code your app entirely by yourself you'll be more aware of what it's doing and what it needs.

I'd like to add that it would be good to learn at least one non-IDE build tool as well. Maven is probably the best one for most people, Ant is most suitable for non-standard projects, and Gradle is good for mixed-language builds (it's the standard these days for Android apps, where Java and Kotlin code may both exist in the same app).

 
Md Zuanyeed Kamal
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Tim Holloway wrote:I'm going to differ with Rob here. Disclaimer: I'm a long-time forum moderator for the Tomcat forum, so I do have a bit of a bias.
The main advantage of Tomcat is that it's lightweight and simple to install and maintain. True, it does not support the advanced features of JEE, but when you're first starting out, servlets and JSPs are enough of a challenge in their own right, Furthermore, Tomcat is not a toy - it's a primary production webapp server in many, many IT shops. In fact I've worked in environments where it was the only webapp server product being used.



I used tomcat for webapps before, but now I want to explore the JavaEE features. For that which one would be best cohice considering as a new learner: Eclipse/JBOSS/TOMEE

I have never used TOMEE before. Do you have any resources that will be helpful to install and learn ?

Thanks
 
Tim Holloway
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Eclipse is not a JEE server. It's an IDE and it can attach to and run/debug webserver code but you'd actually need to install a JEE server itself.

I'm not knowledgeable in TomEE myself. But JBoss/Wildfly is fairly easy to work with.
 
Md Zuanyeed Kamal
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Tim Holloway wrote:Eclipse is not a JEE server. It's an IDE and it can attach to and run/debug webserver code but you'd actually need to install a JEE server itself.

I'm not knowledgeable in TomEE myself. But JBoss/Wildfly is fairly easy to work with.



Instead of glassfish, I put eclipse by mistake
 
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MZK: please don't edit posts after they have been replied to. I have refused the edit.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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