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How is Optimising issue being handled by Spring Boot ?

 
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Hi experts,

I was questioning someone of using Stored procedure vs SpringBoot JPA which uses Hibernate under the hood?

So, now since SpringBoot naturally advocates its own goodness but I heard in reality that Hibernate would fetch unneeded data and thus not achieving optimisation.

How is this kind of problem handled ?
 
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Stored procedures are something that I recommend avoiding where possible regardless of the framework you are using. Stored procedures tend to lock you into a particular database vendor plus they make it harder to determine where business data logic resides - on the DBMS server or in application code, thus raising time and cost of system maintenance. Plus it's generally harder to keep version control over stored logic than it is for application code.

The main reasons for using stored procedures would be in cases where performance was prohibitively worse when doing database logic in application code or the same logic needed to be shared between multiple applications. Both conditions are typically pretty rare.

Spring Boot really doesn't impact this. If Hibernate is being inefficient, then it's Hibernate you need to tune and that process is the same for Spring Boot as for regular Spring or even non-Spring apps.
 
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Tim Holloway wrote:Stored procedures are something that I recommend avoiding where possible regardless of the framework you are using. Stored procedures tend to lock you into a particular database vendor plus they make it harder to determine where business data logic resides - on the DBMS server or in application code, thus raising time and cost of system maintenance. Plus it's generally harder to keep version control over stored logic than it is for application code.

The main reasons for using stored procedures would be in cases where performance was prohibitively worse when doing database logic in application code or the same logic needed to be shared between multiple applications. Both conditions are typically pretty rare.

Spring Boot really doesn't impact this. If Hibernate is being inefficient, then it's Hibernate you need to tune and that process is the same for Spring Boot as for regular Spring or even non-Spring apps.



Thank you so much for answering my question because this is the exact thought in my mind, even though I was still very green in this field 4 years back.  Unfortunately, I was deem a failure by the school and refused to give me my cert after clearing all my exams.

Now, I am subjected to all kinds of coding tests which I doubt I can pass.

Sorry for the rant again.
 
Tim Holloway
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I don't have any of the major certs. The best I can claim is stuff that I got from training courses on obsolete IBM networking systems and the like. I am not a big fan of most certs since they're often just collections of "gotcha"s and indicate no real competence. I threw down the Java cert study guide in disgust when they got to the part on asserts. I was a long-standing fan of asserting in C code before Java came out, but Java has an incredibly complex assertion system. That, so far as I've seen, absolutely nobody has ever used/ I don't even recall it being employed in the JVM source code, come to think of it.

If I ever feel the need for assertions in Java, I'll look it up and it probably will have changed from what I was supposed to memorize all those years ago. I have to reserve my memory for daily essentials. For the rest, as Sherlock Holmes once said, there's the lumber room of my library (or web searches).

Unfortunately, Human Resources departments like certs and diplomas because it provides an easy way to automate themselves out of actually screening candidates. Though just this week there has been quite a conversation about how that approach is depriving corporations of essential and valuable workers. I don't think I've ever obtained a job applying via HR myself.
 
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