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dutch old silver coin

 
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Hello,

A few days ago when I cleaned my house I found relic coin from my great grand mother, There is symbol in the coin that often appear especially on hospital,

please take a look :

coin image

Could someone mention name and meaning of this symbol ?

Thanks
 
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It is too small to see clearly, but it looks like a caduceus←link.
 
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Campbell is correct, it's a caduceus (staff of Hermes/Mercury).

This symbol is used as the mintmark of the royal Dutch mint in Utrecht, the Netherlands. All coins that were minted in Utrecht since 1830 carry this symbol.
 
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And following the link I gave you earlier told me that the medicaal mark isn't a caduceus, but an Aesculapius' staff; that only has one snake on.
 
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:And following the link I gave you earlier told me that the medicaal mark isn't a caduceus, but an Aesculapius' staff; that only has one snake on.



Most people don't realize that. Including, alas, some medical facilities!
 
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The Wikipedia article gives some explanation for that, too.
 
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gong tji wrote:
Could someone mention name and meaning of this symbol ?

Thanks



Stays for symbol of immortality, health, is an hermetic symbol, I guess  and is my guess deriving from the two current of energy in the spine, the so called ida and pingala in the indian tradition, and imported in the west. Is popular because represents an invariant of all the life, that is transformation.
 
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The two different snake rods are symbolic of 2 different Greek gods.

The κηρύκειον (caduceus) is the often-winged double-snake staff held in the left hand of Hermes (it's not uncommon for trickster gods to be wrong-handed). It's actually supposed to indicate that the bearer is a herald (of the gods in particular). Hermes (Mercury) is the messenger and herald of the gods when he/she's not up to no good (Hermes is, and gives name to "hermaphrodite"). The wings are symbolic of Hermes' ability to travel at the speed of thought, as are the winged hat and sandals often portrayed.

The Rod of Asclepius (Ασκληπιού) is symbolic of the Greek god of healing and medicine and never has wings. The snake was originally part of healing rituals, and in fact, the Greek word "pharmakon" (φάρμᾰκον) means both medicinal drug and poison, indicating that even back then it was well known that the usage and dosage made the difference. Ivermectin is a famous modern example. Not because it can kill a virus, but because it can poison parasites.

Any attempt to specifically tie any of this back to Indian medicinal/spiritual concepts is probably pushing things, but there is evidence that some of the concepts and possibly god-prototypes may have come from Mesopotamia. Where they got it from one can only speculate.
 
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