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Dealing with all the legacy codes and old technologies

 
Ranch Hand
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hi guys,

I am quite disturbed at the things I am doing - basically learning old technologies like jaxb that are done in 2008 and earlier.
So, I got to know how to use windows batch and cmd files and ant to do all sort of deployment and compilation etc.

Thus, I would like to check if all these skills worth picking up ?

Hope to hear some experts insights before I get sank further....tks.
 
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JAXB is still being used, as are Windows and Ant. If you were you hoping to use only brand-new, shiny things in your career, I'm afraid that is very unrealistic.
 
Marshal
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A few years ago, some really old technology became highly sought after: Cobol. Anybody who knew Cobol could command a very high salary.
 
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With the possible exception of Ant, none of the things you mentioned are "legacy".

Personally I do consider Ant legacy, because there really are much better options than Ant for new projects.
 
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Ironically, the CodeRanch jForum software uses JAXB. I've been trying to update its build and run environment and had to deal with JAXB no longer being a pre-supplied part of the JVM.

It's also built with Ant. So is the popular Tomcat web application server. There's no real interest in moving either of those systems to some other build environment, as they do just fine and their maintainers like Ant.

A considerable part of the business world is "old" software. Usually the most important parts, in fact. COBOL and Java are often used in large part because you can take 20-year old source code and still build and maintain it. Unlike, say Python 2, which is no longer distributed with Linux, since Python 3 supplanted it (and the differences are roughly the same as going from Microsoft Visual Basic to VB.Net). Ruby on Rails blew out quickly and the trendy JavaScript platforms suffer from the fact that JavaScript has been going through its own set of changes.

Sometime boring is better.

 
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