This week's book giveaways are in the Jython/Python and Object-Oriented programming forums.
We're giving away four copies each of Machine Learning for Business: Using Amazon SageMaker and Jupyter and Object Design Style Guide and have the authors on-line!
See this thread and this one for details.
Win a copy of Machine Learning for Business: Using Amazon SageMaker and JupyterE this week in the Jython/Python forum
or Object Design Style Guide in the Object-Oriented programming forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Bear Bibeault
  • Paul Clapham
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Knute Snortum
Sheriffs:
  • Liutauras Vilda
  • Tim Cooke
  • Junilu Lacar
Saloon Keepers:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Tim Moores
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Joe Ess
  • salvin francis
  • fred rosenberger

A Big Hit in France

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 3404
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
THe original :
Oh mein Gott! Ich habe eine Axt im Kopf!
For consistency :
O mein Gott! Es gibt ein axt im meine kopf!
For urgency :
Mensch! Gibt's ein Axt im meine kopf!
universal :
k:-(
German dialects :
German: O mein Gott! Es gibt ein axt im meine kopf.
German (Carinthian dialect):
Um Goddes wuell, do is a hackale im meim schaedahle.
German (Styrian dialect):
Jessas, i hab a hockn im schaedel.
German (Upper Austrian dialect):
H�mmi, Orsch und Zwirn! Do steckt a Hocka in meina Birn.
German (Vorarlbergerisch; West Austrian dialect):
Hargol�ss, do ischt an agscht i minoem griand!
 
Wanderer
Posts: 18671
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
[Map]: From an article in Wikipedia, now deleted.
Not deleted - just misspelled. Here.
[ January 11, 2004: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
Leverager of our synergies
Posts: 10065
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you, Jim. I updated my personal links list.
--------------------
"I see you spell colour incorrectly" -- HS Thomas
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1408
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In comparing English with Frisian, Dutch or German, one must take into account that these languages have been diverging for 1,500 years. Even common words change in pronunciation and meaning, and do so differently when population groups are separated. Words recently borrowed are more likely to line up precisely than base words with common origins.


-girl
Middle English girle
Frisian: famke
French: fille


I wonder whether there's a Norse cognate to "girl".


+yellow
Middle English yelow, from Old English geolu.
Frisian: giel
French: jaune


It's even closer to the German "gelb" (in that the `w' in "yellow" lines up with the `b' in "gelb").


?strong
Middle English, from Old English strang.
Frisian: kr�ftich, sterk
French: fort


There's a German cognate, "streng" which means "strict" or "severe".
There's an English cognate to Frisian "sterk", ie. "stark" (meaning severe).
There's an English cognate to the Fresian "kreftich", i.e. "crafty".


-think
Middle English thenken, from Old English thencan.
Frisian: achtenearje, achtsje, miene
French: pensez


German has "denken" is there no Frisian cognate?


-tree
Middle English, from Old English trow.
Frisian: beam
French: arbre


I wonder whether the English "beam" (a big plank of wood) is a cognate of the Frisian "beam" (or German "baum").


flower
Middle English flour, flower, best of anything, flour, from Old French flor, from Latin floos, floor
Frisian: blom
French: Fleur
Disqualified, as of not Germanic origin.


Of course, a cognate to the Frisian "blom" (and German "Blum") is the English word "bloom" (usually used as a verb.


+Dog
Middle English dogge, from Old English docga.
Frisian: dogge, h�n
French: chien


I believe German has a cognate to "dog" which refers to one particular breed, just as English has a cognate to Frisian "hun" and German "Hundt" -- namely "hound" (which in English refers to a particular kind of dog).
 
Frank Silbermann
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1408
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Damien Howard: Since Rome/Italy was fonded by the Greeks, why is it that many romance languages are attributed to Latin instead of Greek?
... Didn't Latin derive from Greek? It seems it should have. Can someone fill in my history gap?


Rome was not founded by the Greeks. According to Roman mythology, it was founded by refugees from Troy, in Asia minor. (The Greeks conquored Rome in the time of Alexander the Great; later the Romans conquored Greece.)
Latin did not derive from Greek. They are both Indo-European languages, but I don't know that their common origins are any more recent that those with Persian, Slavic, German or Celtic.
Being near each other, they probably had a substantial vocabulary exchange, much like French and English have had with one another.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 5093
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

German has "denken" is there no Frisian cognate?


The same word is used in Dutch, Saxon, and probably Frisian as well.

Middle English flour, flower, best of anything, flour, from Old French flor, from Latin floos, floor
Frisian: blom


Strangely, the word blom (bloem in Dutch) is used also (sometimes, not exclusively) where English uses the word flour, not just flower.
AFAIK the French 'fleur' is not used like that.
Some link after all somewhere?

I believe German has a cognate to "dog" which refers to one particular breed, just as English has a cognate to Frisian "hun" and German "Hundt" -- namely "hound" (which in English refers to a particular kind of dog).


Correct. There is a group of dogs that in German and Dutch are called 'dog' (pronounced dogh in English).

Rome was not founded by the Greeks. According to Roman mythology, it was founded by refugees from Troy, in Asia minor. (The Greeks conquored Rome in the time of Alexander the Great; later the Romans conquored Greece.)


Which is likely as artifacts have been recovered in the area which are similar to Troyan artifacts.
Ancient Troy would be counted as Greek, insofar as the term existed back then (the Hellenistic civilisation wouldn't come into existence until centuries later, but the people of mainland Greece and Troy were certainly related ethnically and politically/economically).
 
Why should I lose weight? They make bigger overalls. And they sure don't make overalls for tiny ads:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!