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Enterprise JavaBeans 2.1 by Stefan Denninger, Ingo Peters, Rob Castenada  RSS feed

 
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<pre>Author/s : Stefan Denninger, Ingo Peters, Rob Castenada
Publisher : APress
Category : Enterprise JavaBeans
Review by : Thomas Paul
Rating : 8 horseshoes
</pre>
This book is aimed towards the experienced Java developer who is familiar with distributed environments, Servlets, JSPs, and JDBC and wants to get a good in-depth introduction into Enterprise JavaBeans. The book starts with an introduction to EJB technology and the EJB architecture in general. This book is translated into English and these beginning chapters seem to suffer a little bit in the translation as some of the sentences are poorly constructed. The later chapters don't have this problem however. After the introduction, the book covers each of the different types of beans (session, entity, and message) in detail with a discussion of when and how to use them. Examples of their use from both the server and client side are provided. The deployment descriptors for each type are also covered. Transactions and security are discussed with examples that help to clearly explain how these mechanisms work in EJBs. The authors then discuss some of the practical issues that arise when developing an EJB application such as performance and bean interaction. In the final chapter, the authors explain where EJB fits in with Web Services and then give a brief discussion of the standard timer service added to EJB 2.1. The authors do a good job of not just showing how to use EJBs but also explaining what it is and why you would want to use it. The level of detail makes this a good book for both developers and architects.


More info at Amazon.com
More info at Amazon.co.uk
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