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Java Number Cruncher by Ronald Mak  RSS feed

 
Bartender
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<pre>Author/s : Ronald Mak
Publisher : Prentice Hall PTR
Category : Miscellaneous Java
Review by : Jason Menard
Rating : 9 horseshoes
</pre>
At one time or another, most of us will likely have to write code performing some amount of numerical computation beyond simple integer arithmetic. As many of us are neither mathematicians nor intimately familiar with the bit gymnastics our machines must perform in order to manipulate numbers, we can get ourselves into trouble if we're not careful. Luckily, "Java Number Cruncher" comes to the rescue.
This book is an introduction to numerical computing using Java providing "non-theoretical explanations of practical numerical algorithms." While this sounds like heady stuff, freshman level calculus should be sufficient to get the most out of this text.
The first three chapters are amazingly useful, and worth the price of admission alone. Mak does a fine job explaining in simple terms the pitfalls of even routine integer and floating-point calculations, and how to mitigate these problems. Along the way the reader learns the details of how Java represents numbers and why good math goes bad. The remainder of the book covers iterative computations, matrix operations, and several "fun" topics, including fractals and random number generation.
The author conveys his excitement for the subject in an easy-to-read, easy-to-understand manner. Examples in Java clearly demonstrate the topics covered. Some may not like that the complete source is in-line with the text, but this is subjective. Overall, I found this book educational, interesting, and quite enjoyable to read.


More info at Amazon.com
More info at Amazon.co.uk
 
Rancher
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Nice review. I like the term "bit gymnastics".
 
Sheriff
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Thanks! I kind of liked the image of little 1's and 0's tumbling and vaulting all over the place.
 
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Sheriff
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When I read this review I thought that some people are born to review books and some are... well, not.
 
Ranch Hand
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hi:
thanks for the good work!
 
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